HEALTH TIPS – NOVEMBER 2017


Topics This Issue:


Find and Treat Diabetes Early


Of the 30.3 million Americans who have diabetes, 7.2 million are not yet diagnosed*. Get tested today.

Nearly one in 10 American’s have diabetes—but many of us don’t know it. Diabetes is a life-altering disease, and it’s important to catch it early. The earlier you detect diabetes, the better your chances of avoiding future health problems.

The best medicine? Learn the basics of diabetes, know your risks and talk with your doctor.

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. It occurs when a person’s body is unable to produce or use insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels in our bodies.There are two types of diabetes:

  • Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. It occurs when the pancreas produces little to no insulin. This form of diabetes can be managed with daily insulin injections.
  • Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 percent of cases. It occurs when your body resists the effects of insulin or doesn’t produce enough. This type is commonly linked to obesity, but not always.

If left untreated, either form of diabetes can increase the risk of serious health complications, including heart attack, kidney disease, limb amputation and blindness.

Diabetes Risk Factors and Symptoms

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include:

  • Age—being over 45
  • Family history of diabetes
  • Being overweight
  • Infrequent or irregular physical activity
  • Women who had diabetes during pregnancy
  • Certain races/ethnicities, such as Pacific Islander, Asian-American, Mexican-American and African-American

Symptoms include frequent infections, extreme fatigue, frequent urination, or tingling and numbness in the hands and feet.

Ask Your Doctor about Screening

If you have one or more risk factors for diabetes or notice any of the above symptoms, talk with your doctor about being screened as soon as possible. If you receive a diabetes diagnosis, you are not alone. Ask your doctor about diabetes education and nutrition support.

If you are looking for a primary care provider, we invite you to meet the PacMed Primary Care team. If you are already living with diabetes or have recently been diagnosed, the PacMed Diabetes Management Program offers comprehensive medical care, health education and support.

*Statistics as reported in the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

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Think of Exercise as Diabetes “Medicine”


There are millions people in the U.S. living with diabetes, and if Dr. Sonja Maddox had her way, they would all be doing one thing to prevent onset of the disease: exercise.

Dr. Maddox, a family medicine physician at PacMed Renton, says people should think about exercise as “medicine.” Here’s how she explains this idea: “If you exercise and you don’t have diabetes, it can help prevent the disease. If you have diabetes and exercise regularly, it will lower your blood pressure, lower blood sugars and can even prevent the need for medication for a long period of time.”

Patients with diabetes can control their weight and blood sugar with diet and exercise. Although a diabetic patient may eventually need oral medication or insulin, exercise can help delay that need. Delaying the progress of the disease also means delaying the ravaging effects of diabetes on the heart and vascular system.

“The reason to work hard—to eat properly and exercise—is that you may have diabetes for just 30 years as opposed to 40 or 50 years. The longer you have the disease, the greater the likelihood you’ll develop retinopathy [eye damage], nephropathy [kidney damage]or heart disease,” says Dr. Maddox.

So what counts as exercise?

You don’t need to run a marathon to reap the benefits of exercise. You don’t even need to jog! Walking between 6,000 and 10,000 steps daily is an attainable goal for most people. Plus, it’s available to everyone. Use a step counter—or simply count your steps for 5 minutes and do some math. If you have mobility problems, water aerobics is a great alternative.

The recommended amount of physical activity is 150 minutes per week. That’s 30 minutes of exercise on five days, or 20 minutes every day. Your routine could include anything from high-intensity exercise to walking or gardening. Any activity that gets the heart rate elevated can be counted as physical activity. So, find something you enjoy and will do, and stick with it! A partner in exercise can also be motivating.

One last point in favor of exercise...

Dr. Maddox points out that medicine works only so well for so long. The more weight a person gains, the less well the medicine will work over time. Getting daily exercise is a health strategy for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes.

Are you looking for a primary care provider? PacMed offers preventive, primary care through our Family Medicine and Internal Medicine teams. Dr. Sonja Maddox sees patients at our Renton clinic.

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Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating


Well, hello holidays! As we approach winter’s many holidays, now is a good time to think about how to savor those special meals—while saving our waistlines at the same time.

You know what November and December mean: winter holidays and festivities. And right alongside these activities come a plethora of delicious food traditions: festive parties, cookie exchanges, exquisite desserts, once-a-year beverages, family meals and homemade treats.

Eating healthily during the winter holidays can prove challenging for even the most disciplined among us. But you can still celebrate while eating better and having fun. Try these tips.

  • Choose pumpkin pie. Pumpkin contains beta carotene, a helpful antioxidant. Pumpkin is also technically a veggie, and one slice can count as a half-serving of your daily recommended amount of vegetables. Finally, a slice of pumpkin pie usually has about 200 fewer calories than other pies, such as apple. This is mostly thanks to pumpkin pie not having a top crust.
  • Cook stuffing separately. When baked inside the turkey, stuffing absorbs the turkey’s fat drippings. Cook it in a pan, and you save on calories and fat. Other ways to cut calories are to use low-fat, low-sodium chicken or vegetable broth instead of butter … swap the bread for a higher-fiber, higher-protein option like wild rice … and replace the giblets, bacon and pork sausage with chicken sausage, nuts, celery, diced carrots, apples or dried cranberries.
  • Eat popcorn—but keep it healthy. Yes, popcorn can be a good snack in a healthy diet! It’s whole grain and a good source of fiber. Roughly three cups of air-popped popcorn equal 100 calories. (That’s about equal to one and a half cheese strings or one-half of a sugar cookie.) To keep things interesting, add toppings such as drizzling olive or canola oil, parmesan cheese or herbs such as rosemary, garlic or dried basil. But avoid too many popcorn balls, kettle corn or caramel corn.
  • Baked potatoes. Potatoes are a good source of potassium and vitamin C. Instead of mashed or scalloped potato dishes, go for the baked potato; it contains fewer calories and fat. If you do have mashed potatoes, substitute skim milk for cream or butter or add in plain yogurt in exchange for sour cream. Then, limit the gravy and add extra vegetables like peppers and green onions to boost flavor.

Making these small changes can help you to alleviate stress and enjoy a healthy holiday season with family and friends. Don’t beat yourself up over the occasional splurge. Just keep your focus; instead of trying to lose weight during the holidays, aim to maintain and avoid seasonal weight gain.

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Stuffed Acorn Squash


Want a fun new recipe for your Thanksgiving spread? Try stuffed squash instead of stuffing to watch your carbohydrates and still get lots of flavor!

Serves 8. Prep time 20 minutes. Cook time 50-60 minutes.

Ingredients:

2 medium acorn squash (about 1 1/4 pounds each), halved width-wise and seeded
Cooking Spray
1 tablespoon Olive Oil
8 ounces Cremini mushrooms, sliced
2 3-ounce links apple chicken sausage, cooked and diced
8 ounces kale, stemmed and chopped
1/2 teaspoons salt (optional)
1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper
1/2 cup fat-free, reduced sodium chicken broth

1 cup dried cornbread stuffing

Optional: Top with dried cranberries

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2. Coat a baking pan with non-stick cooking spray and place squash cut-side down in the pan. Add about an inch of water and bake for 30 minutes.

3. While the squash is baking, add olive oil to a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Sauté mushrooms and chicken sausage until golden brown. Add kale, salt (optional) and pepper and sauté until kale is wilted, about 5-7 minutes.

4. Add the chicken broth and cornbread stuffing to the mushroom mixture and simmer until all of the liquid is absorbed.

5. Remove squash from the oven. Turn the squash over in the pan so the cut side is up. Fill each squash with ¼ of the mushroom mixture then return to the oven. Bake for 15 minutes.

6. Cut each squash in half and serve.

Optional: Sub spinach, collards or Brussels sprouts for kale

Recipe from the American Diabetes Association at diabetes.org.

Nutrition Information per Serving (1/2 sweet potato)

Calories: 150, Total Fat 5g, Cholesterol 20mg, Sodium: 280mg, Total Carbohydrate: 21g, Dietary Fiber 5g, Protein: 6g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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Diabetes Screenings from The Living Well Alliance


Get diabetes health screens or educational classes for your employees today! We can help.

As of 2015, 30.3 million Americans have diabetes and an estimated 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed each year.* This is why it’s important to know your risk of developing this disease. At the Living Well Alliance, we have found that health screenings—such as for diabetes and prediabetes—are paramount to each employee’s ability to take charge of his or her ongoing health.

The Living Well Alliance offers a complimentary biometric health screening that measures the participant’s risk of developing diabetes. Our screenings, always conducted by our registered dietitian or registered nurse, are confidential and give participants the opportunity to ask other health-related questions. Participants will also gain an idea of their risk for other chronic diseases.

Our goal is to slow down the diabetes epidemic, while also helping individuals and companies control future health care costs. Small steps add up. If we each check our risk yearly, whether at our doctor’s office or at employer events, we can have a big impact in controlling this disease.

If you and your employees want to change behaviors to achieve better health, the best place to begin is with information delivered by trustworthy professionals. The Living Well Alliance is passionate about supporting your employees, so visit us for more information about booking a biometric screening today.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 206.621.4419 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

*Statistics as reported in the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – OCTOBER 2017


Topics This Issue:


Designing a Breast Cancer Prevention Strategy


How often should you have a screening? What should your prevention strategy be? October is Breast Cancer Awareness month—a perfect time to talk with your provider about a strategy for you.

About one in eight U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer, but due to great medical advances, around 80 percent will survive it. Still, breast cancer remains the second-deadliest cancer in women (after lung cancer). It is important to know your personal risk factors so you can take steps to reduce your risk.

Fortunately, this cancer is highly preventable. Read on for two important prevention steps. And of course, if you have questions, make an appointment with your primary care doctor to learn more.

Risk Factors

When deciding on your breast-cancer prevention and screening strategy, consider the following risk factors:

  • Being female and older age
  • Personal or family history of breast cancer, especially among close relatives
  • Early onset of menstruation
  • Later onset of menopause
  • Dense breasts (as learned after a mammogram)
  • History of breast health problems found in biopsies

Lifestyle factors play a moderate role in the development of breast cancer. Weight gain after menopause, working night shifts, alcohol use and several hormone-replacement therapies are known to increase the risk. On the other hand, having a baby before age 30, breastfeeding, regular exercise and a Mediterranean-like diet—rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and olive oil—all seem to aid in reducing the risk of developing breast cancer.

Screening

Despite the value of knowing your risks, many breast-cancer cases develop without obvious risk factors. This is why age-appropriate breast-cancer screenings are essential for all women.

The best approach to breast cancer detection is regular mammograms.

  • Mammograms should be performed every 1-2 years beginning at age 40, based upon discussion with your provider.
  • If you’re over age 75, the benefits of mammograms are less certain.
  • Breast self-exams are a good practice. Knowing how your breasts normally look and feel can help you be aware of changes, which you can share with your healthcare provider. Finding a change doesn’t necessarily mean there is cancer.

If you have a family history, talk with your doctor about testing for hereditary cancer syndromes, such as BRCA gene mutations.

PacMed offers several options for primary care providers, an excellent place to begin a conversation about breast cancer prevention. Learn about our Primary Care team. We also invite you to explore our Women’s Health offerings and our Oncology department.

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Nutrition for Cancer Prevention


By Kathleen Bradley, RD, CD

According to the National Cancer Institute, dietary factors are thought to be the cause for about 30% of cancers in Western countries. Fortunately, diet is one of the cancer risk factors you have the power to alter. Read on to learn how foods in your daily diet can lower your potential risk of developing cancer.

Western countries have diets statistically high in animal products, fat and sugar—and also have high rates of colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, according to the National Institutes of Health. Being overweight or obese has also been seen to increase the risks of several common cancers. Nutrition guidelines for cancer prevention are similar to those for preventing other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Work with your primary care provider or a dietitian to gauge your overall dietary health.

Some nutrition and dietary factors to consider:

Fiber and other cancer-fighting nutrients. Studies show that fiber provides potential protective effects against cancer. While it is recommended to consume least 25-30 grams of fiber per day, the average U.S. citizen consumes only 10-15 grams. Fiber is found in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and legumes. Other cancer-fighting substances in fruits and vegetables include carotenoids; beta-carotene, vitamins C, E, K; folate; flavones and indoles.

Aim to fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, and make at least half your grains whole grains. A diet rich in these plant-based foods can also help you stay at a healthy weight.

Fat intake. Recent studies show an excessive consumption of fat affects cancer risks. The average U.S. diet contains about 37 percent fat. While the National Cancer Institute suggests lowering your intake to 30 percent, other studies find that dropping fat consumption well below 30 percent may have an anti-cancer effect.

Reduce your intake of foods with added sugars and solid fats, which provide a lot of calories but few nutrients. These foods include sugar-sweetened beverages, processed snack foods and desserts.

Meat. Certain cooking and processing techniques of meats may lead to an increased cancer risk. The processes of smoking, salting, adding nitrates or related compounds, and cooking at high temperatures can convert meats into carcinogenic compounds within the colon.

Your best bet is to limit processed meats and instead include a variety of whole-food-based protein such as fish, skinless poultry and lean cuts of pork and beef. Consider eating plant-based sources of protein such as beans more often.

Alcohol. Excessive intake of alcohol raises one’s risks for cancers of the breast, mouth, pharynx and esophagus, as well as potential stomach, liver and colon cancers. It is considered more harmful when combined with smoking.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends limiting alcoholic drinks—if consumed at all—to one serving daily for women and two for men. (A serving of alcohol is considered 1½ fluid ounces of hard liquor, 5 fluid ounces of wine or 12 fluid ounces of beer.)

For more information about PacMed and our dietitian services, please visit www.PacMed.org. To make an appointment, use the PacMed appointment tool or call 206.505.1300.

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Safety on Halloween Night


It’s a dark night, and groups of frantically excited kids in costumes are darting along sidewalks, bouncing off the curbs. They are excited to be hauling in candy. What could possibly go wrong?

Forget about vampires. You should be worried about cars. The Seattle Police Department recommends on its website that kids take flashlights out trick-or-treating. Remind your kids how tough it is for drivers to see at night, especially at dusk. And, of course, tell them not to weave between parked cars to get across the street. The candy will wait!

Make sure costumes are visible and that your child can see well. Make sure masks and big hair are clear of the eyes—and stay that way when jumping and running. Have a Batman, witch or other black-clad character in your group? Add a flashlight, glow sticks, glow jewelry or reflective tape.

Rethink trailing hemlines and large swords. They can be tripping hazards … and as the evening wears on, they aren’t much fun if your child is having trouble keeping up with friends! Warn your child, too, about candles in jack-o-lanterns. If costumes get too close, they can catch fire.

Keep big plastic bags away from small children who are out trolling for candy. If pulled over the face or head, they are a suffocation hazard. For treats, use a plastic pumpkin container or a cloth bag.

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Halloween Tricks for Your Treats


By Christy Goff, Registered Dietitian

Halloween night is exciting and fun … but then comes the sugar hangover the next day, week or even month! Let me share with you some tips and tricks for navigating that large pot of candy so you can have a healthier start to the holidays this year.

1.  Make a plan. Creating a plan with structure for you and your children keeps everyone on track. Some parents plan to indulge on Halloween night and then throw or give the rest away, while others put the candy bounty into plastic bags to have better portion control over the days that follow. Make your plan clear to your children as soon as you start talking about costumes and then stick to the plan throughout the holiday.

2.  Always eat a balanced dinner before trick-or-treating. This will reduce the chance that hunger will dictate the amount of sweets you will indulge in later on.Teaching yourselves and children about balance while allowing room for treats is an important conversation to have throughout the whole year to maintain a positive relationship with food choices.

3.  Understand portion sizes.Typically children should have no more than 1-2 pieces of candy per day and they should be given the candy with a meal to ensure the intake of healthy nutrients in addition. Even better, let them pick the meal they get to eat it at. Keep the candy in a special place so the kids can see it, but is not accessible easily, such as the top of the fridge or high counter. If there is just too much candy to manage, try using the rest as an art design, a lesson in sharing with others or throw it away.

4.  Don’t deny treats or use them as a reward. Typically prohibiting treats or using them as a reward causes the desire for sweets to grow even more, especially if they are forced to do something they don’t want to do like clean, eat their veggies etc.Your child will to learn to manage sweets better if they are given in the same meal and treated the same as any other foods.Go back to your plan and decide what works best for your family to allow treats in moderation.

5.  Enjoy the night! Focus on celebrating the holiday and spending time with family and friends.Remember that a balanced diet is created over time and all foods can be enjoyed in moderation, including treats.

For more information about Halloween treats and good health, visit the Ellyn Satter Institute.

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Handwashing: Don't Swish and Go!


We have all watched someone quickly rinse their hands in a restroom and rush out the door—or skip the sink altogether. Body fluids and viruses are invisible to the naked eye, but these germs are everywhere. They contaminate commonly touched surfaces like handles, doors, walls, counters and paper dispensers.

To help your family avoid the flu, there is no substitute for handwashing. Disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers also work well, although they don’t remove dirt and grime.

Handwashing is one of the most effective ways to stop disease.

Wash your hands often: always before eating or preparing food, and always after using the bathroom or changing a diaper.

  • Soap and water work well to kill germs. Rub your hands briskly.
  • How long? At least 20 seconds—try humming “Happy Birthday” through twice.
  • Most people miss the backs of the fingers and thumbs … fingertips … the creases in the palms.
  • Use a paper towel to turn off faucets and to open the door.

With flu season here, give your hands the soapy wash they deserve. Take two minutes to safeguard your health—and wash your hands!

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Simple Sweet Potato Fries


Baked sweet potato fries will be your new favorite side dish.The combination of crispy outside and tender inside will delight your taste buds.Sweet potatoes are loaded with healthy nutrients like beta-carotene (a precursor to vitamin A), vitamin C, potassium, fiber and B vitamins to help ward off winter illness.Eat up!

Serves 6. Prep time 10 minutes. Cook time 20 minutes.

Ingredients:

3 medium sweet potatoes (about 2 lbs)
2-3 tablespoons potato or corn starch
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

2. Wash sweet potatoes and cut into thin wedges.

3. In a large plastic bag, combine sweet potatoes, starch, spices and salt and mix together until evenly coated.Add oil slowly and toss vigorously to combine.(A large mixing bowl works fine, too.)

4. Spread fries in a single layer on a lined baking sheet.

5. Bake for 20 minutes or until crispy on one side.Turn fries and bake for another 20 minutes or until golden brown.Watch for burning edges.

Recipe adapted by PacMed’s registered dietitian Christy Goff, MS, RDN, CD

Nutrition Information per Serving (1/2 sweet potato)

Calories: 174, Total Fat 3g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium: 214mg, Total Carbohydrate: 37g, Dietary Fiber 6g, Sugar: 7g, Protein: 3g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 206.621.4419 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – SEPTEMBER 2017


Topics This Issue:


Raising Awareness of Cervical Cancer


PacMed is honoring September as National Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

What is the cervix? The cervix is the lower end of the uterus. This is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer.

Fortunately, this cancer is highly preventable. Read on for two important prevention steps. And of course, if you have questions, make an appointment with your primary care doctor to learn more.

PacMed offers several options for primary care providers. Learn about our Primary Care team.

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Two Steps to Help Prevent Cervical Cancer


Human papillomavirus, better known as HPV, is the main cause of cervical cancer. It is also the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. The HPV vaccine protects against the types of HPV that most often cause cervical cancer.

When detected early, cervical cancer is highly curable. But the cancer in its early stages may have no signs or symptoms. This is why regular screening is so important.

Get Vaccinated! The HPV Vaccine

HPV vaccination is recommended for:

  • Preteen girls and boys ages 11 and 12.
  • Women ages 13 through 26 who haven’t been vaccinated yet or have not completed the vaccine series.

Get Screened! The Pap Test

Regular screening, also called a Pap test, is recommended for:

  • All women aged 21 to 65 (including women who got the HPV vaccination)

For preteens, PacMed has a professional and approachable team of Pediatrics providers. Our Gynecology team is available to women.

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Four Health Issues That Embarrass Many Women


Some health topics can seem too embarrassing to talk about—even in the privacy of a doctor’s office. It’s understandable. Sharing personal information with a person you hardly know is bound to be unsettling.

Understand, however, that medical providers want to help you be healthy and happy. These are common issues, so you’re likely not the first person to raise them with your provider!

Urinary incontinence

Millions of women experience involuntary loss of urine. This is called urinary incontinence (UI). The severity of UI can vary anywhere from slightly bothersome to totally debilitating. Rather than avoid activities you love, speak with your medical provider! UI is a health problem that often can be helped through medication and muscle-strengthening exercises.

Urinary tract infections or UTIs

When bacteria get into your bladder or kidneys, it can cause a urinary tract infection. You may experience a burning sensation when urinating, frequent urges to urinate, pressure or pain, and discolored or odd-smelling urine. Your provider can treat you with antibiotics—and give you behavioral and dietary tips to help you avoid UTIs in the future.

Frequent urination

When frequent urination becomes a distraction in your life or prevents you from activities with family and friends, you should see your doctor. Many factors can contribute to this issue, such as too much caffeine, constipation, an unhealthy weight and smoking. But it’s wise to first begin with a visit to your health clinic; frequent urination can also be caused by a nerve signal or overactive bladder.

Contraception

A multitude of contraception methods is available today. Oral contraceptives, condoms, implants… All protect against pregnancy, but how do you know which one works best for you and your partner? By talking with your doctor, you can choose the method that’s right for you.

Talking about these things can be uncomfortable and difficult, but addressing them is important. Find a doctor you are comfortable with. PacMed invites you to explore our team of Family Medicine/Obstetrics and Gynecology providers.

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Broccoli Apple Salad


Broccoli is a popular vegetable for its versatility in main or side dishes and because it provides great health benefits for detoxifying the body. Try this version of broccoli salad with a healthy twist –a yogurt dressing!

Serves 4. Prep time 10 minutes.

Ingredients:

1-2 large crowns of broccoli
2 apples (any variety of your choice)

For dressing

1 tablespoon non-fat plain yogurt
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon fresh dill, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste

Optional toppings:

Raisins, sunflower seeds, walnuts or cheese

Preparation:

1. Separate the broccoli into its florets and then thinly slice. Place in a bowl.

2. Halve and core the apples. Slice apple into thin pieces and then mix with broccoli.

3. To prepare dressing, mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Taste and season with salt and pepper to your preference.

4. Pour dressing over the broccoli and apple mixture, and toss well to coat vegetables.

Tip: If you put salad in the fridge for 10 minutes before serving, it will stay crisp slightly longer.

Recipe adapted from Leanne Brown by Christy Goff, MS, RDN, CD

Nutrition Information per Serving (1/4 recipe)

Calories: 75, Total Fat 1g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 1mg, Sodium: 14mg, Total Carbohydrate: 16g, Dietary Fiber 4g, Sugar: 9g, Protein: 2g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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Back to School and Bullying


With back-to-school season just around the corner, children are watching the final days of summer vacation slip away as the first day of school looms ahead. This naturally calls for a mix of excitement, nervousness and - in most cases - anxiety. Students of all ages often struggle with anxiety when preparing for the school year ahead as fears of the unknown flood their mind.

Who will be their teacher? Will they have friends in their classes? Will they get picked on?

As a parent, friend or loved one, there are proactive steps you can take to combat back-to-school anxiety and give children the confidence they need to excel in school. Rene Czerwinski, Licensed Mental Health Counselor from Pacific Medical Centers, provides insight on how to identify signs of anxiety in children and tools to equip them for success throughout the school year.

Read the complete article here.

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Flu Shot Clinics at PacMed, 2017


Should I get the flu shot? Get your questions answered here. Get your flu shots today at PacMed!

Beacon Hill

  • Thursday, September 14, 8 a.m.–noon
  • Saturday, September 16, 8 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Thursday, September 21, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

Canyon Park

  • Saturday, September 30, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Saturday, October 14, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Federal Way

  • Saturday, September 16, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Thursday, September 28, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

First Hill

  • Monday, September 11, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Friday, September 22, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

Lacey

  • Saturday, September 9, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Lynnwood

  • Wednesday, October 4, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.
  • Wednesday, October 18, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

Northgate

  • Saturday, September 9, 8 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, September 20, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.
  • Friday, October 6, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Puyallup

  • Thursday, September 14, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.
  • Monday, September 25, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Renton

  • Saturday, September 9, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Saturday, September 23, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.
  • Saturday, September 30, 9 a.m.–1 p.m.

Totem Lake

  • Thursday, October 12, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.
  • Thursday, October 26, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – AUGUST 2017


Topics This Issue:


Back to School Already?!


Doesn’t summer break always go by faster than you think? Like most parents, you’re probably already thinking about all the steps to getting your children school-ready. Don’t forget about well-child checkups, sports physicals andimmunizations.

Beat the Rush!

Your child may be due for a well-child check-up if he or she has not been seen in the past 12 months. Well-child visits to your primary care provider (PCP) are an essential part of keeping your child healthy.These exams include immunization updates and various health and development screenings. You can also schedule a sports physical with us!

Avoid the last-minute rush and make an appointment soon. When you schedule the appointment, let your doctor’s office know if you need immunization and other records for school purposes. If you have a school form to submit, fill out as much of it in advance. This will leave more time for you, your child and your child’s primary care physician to focus on health.

Immunize the Whole Family

Adults also need immunizations to stay healthy and keep children healthy. By being vaccinated, adults help protect people around them, especially infants and people with chronic conditions or weakened immune systems.

At PacMed, our pediatric providers will become your partner in your child’s health. Call us at 1.888.4.PACMED (1.888.472.2633) to schedule your child’s appointment or visit us here. Please verify covered services with your insurance company prior to making an appointment.

Come to a PacMed Back-to-School Event!


Come meet our providers! We love doing these energetic, family-focused events, with snacks and games and fun activities. You also can pick up a well-child immunization card.

Federal Way clinic—Back-to-School Backpack Giveaway,* Aug. 9, 5-8pm

Canyon Park clinic—Back-to-School Event, Aug. 26, 10am-1pm

*While supplies last. 200 backpacks will be given away to first arrivers.

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Summertime and Your Kids


Parents, what fun activities are your kids doing this summer? Staying physically fit is as important as completing their summer reading list! Be sure to mix fun with safety for a successful summer.

Safety first! Avoid injury and promote safety:

  •  Stay hydrated. Always take water with you for outside activities.
  •  Be a smart hiker. Take a rain jacket and warm layers, plus water and snacks. Tell someone exactly where you will hike and when you should be back.
  •  Take care in the sun. Apply sunscreen at least 20 minutes before going outside.
  •  Stretch first. Do some simple stretches to loosen up before walking or hiking.
  •  Protect the head. Ensure kids wear helmets when riding a bike, skateboard, scooter or other toy. Ask an expert to help you properly fit your child’s helmet so that it’s snug, level and comfortable.
  •  Take care in the heat. Be cautious with vigorous outside activities during the midday heat.
  •  Water fun? Keep eyes on the kids. When around water, give children your full attention—kids aren’t safe just because they know how to swim. Even a bucket, fountain or shallow wading pool is a drowning hazard. Drain containers when play is done.
  •  Check pool for safety measures. Choose pools with high fences that lock, lifeguards on duty and safety/rescue equipment nearby.
  •  Wear life jackets. On boats or docks, make sure all children wear a well-fitted life jacket that’s Coast Guard approved.

Now—get those kids moving! Here are some ideas:

  • Run through a sprinkler.
  • Go to a beach and skip rocks, look for small critters in the sand and rocks, or count seagulls.
  • Take a walk along a river. Keep an eye out for fish, insects or other creatures using the water.
  • Fly a kite.
  • Shoot hoops at the local school playground.
  • Play “follow the leader” at a nearby park or through the neighborhood.
  • Learn to hula hoop.
  • Get together with friends and have relay races, keep a beach ball up in the air, do somersaults, roll down a small hill, play tug-o-war, etc.

Active, physical exercise helps children increase self-confidence, boost coordination and build strong muscles and bones—along with a healthy appetite!

Have questions about child safety and health? Our pediatricians can help.

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Foods to Promote Healthy Skin


Now that our sunny days are finally here, it’s important to consider consuming antioxidant-rich foods that have a protective effect for skin. Four nutrients that promote healthy, radiant skin are vitamins A, E and C and omega-3 fats. Here is some useful background, plus tips on how to incorporate foods rich in these nutrients into your daily diet. (Be sure to consult your doctor for advice regarding appropriate doses of these nutrients.)

Vitamin A: This vitamin has an essential role in skin health by decreasing cell damage and helping the healing process of bodily wounds. Low levels of vitamin A can lead to a dry, flaky complexion. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) to consume is 900 mcg for men and 700 mcg for women. Don’t hesitate to increase your intake of sweet potatoes, carrots, spinach, apricots, cantaloupe and other yellow and orange fruits and vegetables.

Vitamin E: This antioxidant nutrient also helps protect against skin damage. Research has shown vitamin E plays an important role in photoprotection, preventing ultraviolet (UV)-induced free-radical damage to skin, as well as having related anti-inflammatory roles in the skin. The RDA for men and women is 15 mg. Try grabbing some sunflower seeds and almonds for your afternoon snack.

Vitamin C: In addition to promoting a strong immune system, this water-soluble vitamin is vital for skin health. Vitamin C has an important role in the synthesis of collagen, a major protein of body tissues that include the skin. Dietary and topical ascorbic acid (a form of vitamin C) have beneficial effects on skin cells, and some studies have shown that vitamin C may also help prevent and treat UV-induced photodamage. The RDA for men is 90 mg and 75 mg for women. Include broccoli, red peppers and green peppers in your favorite dishes, or enjoy oranges, strawberries or kiwi for dessert.

Omega-3 fatty acids: These healthy fats are considered essential fatty acids. They are necessary for human health, but the body can’t make them; you have to get them through food. Research has shown that omega-3 anti-inflammatory properties include a protective effect against sunburn and helping prevent premature aging. One of the symptoms of omega-3 deficiency includes dry skin. An adequate intake (AI) for men and women is about 1 g daily. Try sardines, tuna or salmon for a quick and delicious dinner tonight.

Kathleen Bradley, RD, CD, is a registered dietitian at our Canyon Park, First Hill and Northgate clinics. Learn more about our dietitian services at PacMed, or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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Grilled Fruit and Balsamic Kabobs


Older kids can help you put fruit on skewers. Adults and kids alike will love the tart-sweet balsamic glaze. You’ll need eight or more 9-12-inch skewers.

Serves 4. Serving size 2 skewers. Prep time 30 minutes; cook time 10 minutes.

Ingredients:

2 cups pineapple chunks

2 cups watermelon chunks

2 bananas, peeled and cut into large chunks

16-ounce package strawberries (stems discarded)

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons honey

1 tablespoon canola oil

Preparation:

1. If your skewers are wood, soak them in water for at least 30 minutes.

2. Heat grill to medium-high heat.

3. Poke fruit onto the skewers. Try to fit 2 pieces of each kind of fruit on each skewer. Place onto a platter or a baking sheet.

4. In a small bowl, mix vinegar, honey and oil. Whisk together. Brush balsamic-honey mixture on fruit with a basting brush.

5. Place fruit kabobs on grill. Turning a two or three times and baste with remaining balsamic-honey mixture. Cook until fruit is caramelized about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve!

Recipe copyright © 2016 American Heart Association.

Nutrition Information per Serving (two 9-inch skewers)

Calories: 199, Total Fat 4.1g, Saturated Fat 0.3g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium: 5.2mg, Total Carbohydrate: 43.1g, Fiber 5.3g, Sugar: 29.9g, Protein: 2.4g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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LWA Updates


To help your organization stay on track with health this summer, the Living Well Alliance is introducing two new classes! Our on-site classes are convenient and led by health professionals.

NEW CLASS: An in-depth look at sugar. In this class, we help your employees wade through all the hype to learn the truth about this molecule and what it does to their health. Participants will learn why humans evolved to crave sugar, the consequences of eating too much and how to read food labels to learn your sugar limit. Employees will leave with suggestions on how to reduce sugar intake and cravings. Is a sugar detox in your future?

NEW CLASS: Making successful behavioral changes. This class is an excellent companion to the nutrition counseling program the Living Well Alliance started in June. Many of us know what we need to change, but turning that knowledge into action is tricky. Class participants will discuss theories that evaluate approaches to change, learn effective methods for successfully changing lifelong habits and finally evaluate their own readiness to change while creating an individualized plan.

Still need a push in the right direction? Living Well Alliance can help! Sign up for individual nutrition counseling with a registered dietitian today. Read our flyer.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 1.206.621.4419 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – JULY 2017


Topics This Issue:


Better Awareness to Prevent Prostate Cancer


Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men. In fact, some 2.5 million men currently live with prostate cancer. It is also the second leading cause of death from cancer for men. Take these steps to learn more and to identify your risk of prostate cancer.

Know the symptoms of prostate cancer. These can include urinary changes such as increased frequency, weak stream, urgency and pain with urinating; erectile issues; blood in the urine or semen; or hip or back pain. However, prostate cancer may also present no symptoms, so it is important to know your risk.

Know your risk factors. A family history of prostate cancer, diet, obesity and smoking can all affect your risk of prostate cancer. Also:

  • Risk for prostate cancer rises after age 50, but this cancer is extremely rare for men under 40.
  • African-American men are at higher risk.

Talk with your doctor about prostate cancer screening. A screening includes a complete health history, questionnaires about urinary and sexual function, and a physical exam to feel the prostate. It also includes urinalysis and PSA (prostate-specific antigen) tests. PSA is an enzyme made by the prostate and can be elevated with cancer, urinary symptoms, infection or enlarged prostate. A biopsy may be conducted if the prostate exam shows irregularities or your PSA is elevated.

According to the American Urological Association, screening is recommended once every two years for men ages 55 to 70. However, your health history and risk factors may require a screening earlier than age 55. Discuss with your doctor if screening is right for you, as there are risks associated with screening, especially if a biopsy is needed.

Meet our Urology team and the medical issues they treat. Or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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Summertime and Your Kids


Parents, what fun activities are your kids doing this summer? Staying physically fit is as important as completing their summer reading list! Be sure to mix fun with safety for a successful summer.

Safety first! Avoid injury and promote safety:

  •  Stay hydrated. Always take water with you for outside activities.
  •  Be a smart hiker. Take a rain jacket and warm layers, plus water and snacks. Tell someone exactly where you will hike and when you should be back.
  •  Take care in the sun. Apply sunscreen at least 20 minutes before going outside.
  •  Stretch first. Do some simple stretches to loosen up before walking or hiking.
  •  Protect the head. Ensure kids wear helmets when riding a bike, skateboard, scooter or other toy. Ask an expert to help you properly fit your child’s helmet so that it’s snug, level and comfortable.
  •  Take care in the heat. Be cautious with vigorous outside activities during the midday heat.
  •  Water fun? Keep eyes on the kids. When around water, give children your full attention—kids aren’t safe just because they know how to swim. Even a bucket, fountain or shallow wading pool is a drowning hazard. Drain containers when play is done.
  •  Check pool for safety measures. Choose pools with high fences that lock, lifeguards on duty and safety/rescue equipment nearby.
  •  Wear life jackets. On boats or docks, make sure all children wear a well-fitted life jacket that’s Coast Guard approved.

Now—get those kids moving! Here are some ideas:

  • Run through a sprinkler.
  • Go to a beach and skip rocks, look for small critters in the sand and rocks, or count seagulls.
  • Take a walk along a river. Keep an eye out for fish, insects or other creatures using the water.
  • Fly a kite.
  • Shoot hoops at the local school playground.
  • Play “follow the leader” at a nearby park or through the neighborhood.
  • Learn to hula hoop.
  • Get together with friends and have relay races, keep a beach ball up in the air, do somersaults, roll down a small hill, play tug-o-war, etc.

Active, physical exercise helps children increase self-confidence, boost coordination and build strong muscles and bones—along with a healthy appetite!

Have questions about child safety and health? Our pediatricians can help.

Back to Top


Foods to Promote Healthy Skin


Now that our sunny days are finally here, it’s important to consider consuming antioxidant-rich foods that have a protective effect for skin. Four nutrients that promote healthy, radiant skin are vitamins A, E and C and omega-3 fats. Here is some useful background, plus tips on how to incorporate foods rich in these nutrients into your daily diet. (Be sure to consult your doctor for advice regarding appropriate doses of these nutrients.)

Vitamin A: This vitamin has an essential role in skin health by decreasing cell damage and helping the healing process of bodily wounds. Low levels of vitamin A can lead to a dry, flaky complexion. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) to consume is 900 mcg for men and 700 mcg for women. Don’t hesitate to increase your intake of sweet potatoes, carrots, spinach, apricots, cantaloupe and other yellow and orange fruits and vegetables.

Vitamin E: This antioxidant nutrient also helps protect against skin damage. Research has shown vitamin E plays an important role in photoprotection, preventing ultraviolet (UV)-induced free-radical damage to skin, as well as having related anti-inflammatory roles in the skin. The RDA for men and women is 15 mg. Try grabbing some sunflower seeds and almonds for your afternoon snack.

Vitamin C: In addition to promoting a strong immune system, this water-soluble vitamin is vital for skin health. Vitamin C has an important role in the synthesis of collagen, a major protein of body tissues that include the skin. Dietary and topical ascorbic acid (a form of vitamin C) have beneficial effects on skin cells, and some studies have shown that vitamin C may also help prevent and treat UV-induced photodamage. The RDA for men is 90 mg and 75 mg for women. Include broccoli, red peppers and green peppers in your favorite dishes, or enjoy oranges, strawberries or kiwi for dessert.

Omega-3 fatty acids: These healthy fats are considered essential fatty acids. They are necessary for human health, but the body can’t make them; you have to get them through food. Research has shown that omega-3 anti-inflammatory properties include a protective effect against sunburn and helping prevent premature aging. One of the symptoms of omega-3 deficiency includes dry skin. An adequate intake (AI) for men and women is about 1 g daily. Try sardines, tuna or salmon for a quick and delicious dinner tonight.

Kathleen Bradley, RD, CD, is a registered dietitian at our Canyon Park, First Hill and Northgate clinics. Learn more about our dietitian services at PacMed, or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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Grilled Fruit and Balsamic Kabobs


Older kids can help you put fruit on skewers. Adults and kids alike will love the tart-sweet balsamic glaze. You’ll need eight or more 9-12-inch skewers.

Serves 4. Serving size 2 skewers. Prep time 30 minutes; cook time 10 minutes.

Ingredients:

2 cups pineapple chunks

2 cups watermelon chunks

2 bananas, peeled and cut into large chunks

16-ounce package strawberries (stems discarded)

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

2 teaspoons honey

1 tablespoon canola oil

Preparation:

1. If your skewers are wood, soak them in water for at least 30 minutes.

2. Heat grill to medium-high heat.

3. Poke fruit onto the skewers. Try to fit 2 pieces of each kind of fruit on each skewer. Place onto a platter or a baking sheet.

4. In a small bowl, mix vinegar, honey and oil. Whisk together. Brush balsamic-honey mixture on fruit with a basting brush.

5. Place fruit kabobs on grill. Turning a two or three times and baste with remaining balsamic-honey mixture. Cook until fruit is caramelized about 8 to 10 minutes. Serve!

Recipe copyright © 2016 American Heart Association.

Nutrition Information per Serving (two 9-inch skewers)

Calories: 199, Total Fat 4.1g, Saturated Fat 0.3g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium: 5.2mg, Total Carbohydrate: 43.1g, Fiber 5.3g, Sugar: 29.9g, Protein: 2.4g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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LWA Updates


To help your organization stay on track with health this summer, the Living Well Alliance is introducing two new classes! Our on-site classes are convenient and led by health professionals.

NEW CLASS: An in-depth look at sugar. In this class, we help your employees wade through all the hype to learn the truth about this molecule and what it does to their health. Participants will learn why humans evolved to crave sugar, the consequences of eating too much and how to read food labels to learn your sugar limit. Employees will leave with suggestions on how to reduce sugar intake and cravings. Is a sugar detox in your future?

NEW CLASS: Making successful behavioral changes. This class is an excellent companion to the nutrition counseling program the Living Well Alliance started in June. Many of us know what we need to change, but turning that knowledge into action is tricky. Class participants will discuss theories that evaluate approaches to change, learn effective methods for successfully changing lifelong habits and finally evaluate their own readiness to change while creating an individualized plan.

Still need a push in the right direction? Living Well Alliance can help! Sign up for individual nutrition counseling with a registered dietitian today. Read our flyer.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 1.206.621.4419 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – JUNE 2017


Topics This Issue:


Cataracts Prevention and Treatment


Almost everyone knows an older family member or friend who has had cataracts. But what are cataracts? Can you avoid them? How do you detect a cataract?

What is a cataract? What are the symptoms? A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that impairs vision. It can occur in one eye or both. A person with a cataract may notice that their vision has become blurred or duller. They may have trouble reading or identifying colors, in particular blues and purples. Their night vision may become compromised and light-sensitive; headlights or lamps may seem too bright or to have a halo or streaks radiating from them.

What is the role of the eye’s lens? The lens in the eye is critical to seeing well. It focuses light that enters the eye onto the retina at the back of the eye, creating an image that is sent to the brain. It also focuses the eye so you can see things far away or close up. Just like a camera with a smudged lens, if the eye’s lens is cloudy, the image quality will be poor.

The lens is made of proteins and water. The proteins are precisely arranged to let light pass through. With a cataract, some of the proteins bunch together and cloud part of the lens. The cloudy area increases over time, making it more difficult to see.

Who gets cataracts? How do I reduce my risk? Although most cataracts occur in older people, others can also experience this. Some children are born with small cataracts. Cataracts also can be caused by surgery, steroid use, exposure to radiation or an eye injury. Finally, some diseases such as diabetes can contribute to your chance of cataracts developing earlier.

You may be able to reduce your risk of a cataract. Avoid UV exposure by wearing sunglasses or regular clear glasses with a UV coating. Outdoors, wear a brimmed hat. Also, get good nutrition—in particular, green, leafy vegetables, fruit and other foods with antioxidants.

It’s also very important to receive regular, preventive eye care from an optometrist or ophthalmologist. A typical eye exam is painless and measures several factors. Your eye doctor will track your vision health over time, record changes and answer your questions.

How are cataracts treated? Nonsurgical treatments aim to improve vision as much as possible. These include maximizing glasses prescription and possibly adding a tint to reduce glare; choosing reading materials with a larger font;ensuring good lighting; and wearing a hat to cut glare.

Surgery may be recommended once the symptoms have progressed to a point that it interferes with your daily activities. The cloudy lens is replaced with a clear artificial lens called an intraocular lens.

The PacMed Optometry team can assess your eye health, and our Ophthalmology department offers cataract surgery. To see which of our providers currently do cataract surgery, please visit our Cataract Surgery page.

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6 Tips to Keep You Lookin‘ Good


The signs and symptoms of many eye issues are so mild that you may not notice them. The best solution? Get routine eye exams. Plus, these six tips are good for eye health.

1. Take a “20-20-20” break. Do you get eye strain from computer work or doing close work? Follow the 20-20-20 rule: Look up every 20 minutes and focus on an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

2. Choose good sunglasses. UV-blocking sunglasses delay the development of cataracts, help prevent eye damage and help prevent wrinkles and cancer. Choose sunglasses that block 100% of UV-A and UV-B rays.

3. Get to know your family tree. Know your family’s history of eye disease. You may be at increased risk for those diseases and may need close monitoring.

4. Ouch! Use protective eyewear. The US has 2.5 million eye injuries each year. But many could be prevented! For home projects, choose ANSI-approved eyewear. Wear protective eyewear designed specifically for your sport.

5. Stub out that cigarette. Smokers are at increased risk of developing cataracts, macular degeneration and disorders of the blood vessels of the eyes.

6. Don’t abuse contact lenses. Follow the instructions about the care and use of contact lenses. Misusing them can result in serious eye conditions that can cause severe pain and vision loss.

Vitamin D.

The first step to good eye care? Make an appointment. We invite you to learn about our Optometry department.

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Smart Nutrition Choices for Eye Health


How does diet play into vision health?

Studies have shown that some nutrients may help prevent age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a common eye condition and the leading cause of vision loss in people over 50 years old. While specific vitamins and supplements are promoted as beneficial, experts agree that the best method is simply to consume a varied diet that’s rich in antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Recommended sources of these specific nutrients include:

  • Dark green vegetables, especially kale, spinach and Swiss chard
  • Most vegetables, especially corn, squash, tomatoes and sweet potatoes
  • Most fruits, especially nectarines, oranges and papaya
  • Egg yolks

In addition to diet, certain lifestyle factors can also affect eye health. Be sure to exercise regularly, avoid smoking and maintain normal blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Check in with your eye care professional on a regular basis as well to receive prompt treatment for any macular issues.

Want to learn more about nutrition? Learn more about our team of dietitians.

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Open-Faced Baked-Egg Croque


Love egg sandwiches but hate the mess? Try baking the egg on top of a thick slice of bread in the oven! Egg yolks provide healthy nutrients like zinc, lutein and zeaxanthin—which protect the eyes—plus choline, which protects the brain.

Serves 2. Prep time 5 minutes; cook time 20 minutes.

Ingredients:

Bread, preferably whole grain, cut into 2 long, thick slices

4 eggs

1 tablespoon grated cheese such as parmesan, gorgonzola or cheddar

1 scallion, chopped

1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley, cilantro or basil

Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 375 F degrees. Cover a pan with aluminum foil.

2. Tear a small hole in the center of each bread slice to accommodate two eggs. Crack two eggs into each slice of bread.

3. Top eggs with cheese and scallion.

4. Bake on a middle rack for 20 minutes (or enough to toast bread and set eggs).

5. Sprinkle fresh herb on top and season with salt and pepper.

Nutrition Information per Serving (1 serving = 1 slice bread with 2 eggs)

Calories: 246, Total Fat 13g, Saturated Fat 4g, Cholesterol 374mg, Sodium: 426mg, Total Carbohydrate: 16g, Dietary Fiber 1g, Sugar: 2g, Protein: 16g

Original recipe by Christy Goff, MS, RDN, CD

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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On-Site Nutrition Counseling from Living Well Alliance


Employees, it is time to take charge of your health! When you feel fit and well, morale improves and illnesses decreases.

Many chronic illnesses can be prevented or improved with a change in lifestyle supported by good nutrition. This is why Living Well Alliance (LWA) is introducing on-site, individualized nutrition counseling. This program is typically offered after a LWA class or screening event at the employer’s offices—so it’s easy for employees to participate. The counseling can support healthy meal planning and weight loss, ease of digestive issues, chronic disease management and other health and fitness goals.

For $200, the Nutrition Counseling program includes three visits:

  • Initial 30-minute, confidential consultation with a registered dietitian
  • Two 15- to 20-minute, individual follow-up visits with each employee, scheduled 2-4 weeks apart.

Additional sessions can be scheduled, or outside referrals can be made. Prior to meeting with the dietitian, participants will fill out a confidential form to gather personal goals and health and food history. The Living Well Alliance team will encourage the goals that employees want to focus on.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 1.206.621.4419 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – MAY 2017


Topics This Issue:


Bone Up on Osteoporosis


Understand your risk factors, when to get screened and ways to protect your bone health.

Osteoporosis, which means“porous bone,” is a silent disease that can have devastating effects. With this disease, bone tissue and mass deteriorate, which leads to frail bones and a higher risk for serious fractures.

“The kicker,” says Dr. Mary Wemple, a rheumatologist at PacMed, “is that this bone-loss condition occurs without symptoms. That’s why screening is so critical.”Because bones weaken gradually over time, people may not know that they have osteoporosis until a sudden strain, bump, or fall causes a fracture.

In the U.S. today, 10 million people already have osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis cannot be cured, it can be effectively treated. Most important, it can be prevented.

Who Is at Risk?

Older women are particularly susceptible. Risk factors for osteoporosis include:

  • Being female
  • Going through menopause
  • Male or female—being slim and less than 130 pounds
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Drinking excess alcohol (more than three glasses daily)
  • Having a first-degree relative with osteoporosis
  • Age—the older you are, the greater your risk

Certain health conditions, medications and ethnicities can also play a factor.

Who Should Get Screened?

Screening for osteoporosis involves a bone density scan. This scan is a quick, painless procedure that uses an enhanced, low-radiation form of X-ray technology called DXA (pronounced “dexa”).

  • Women: If you are over age 65, screening is highly recommended. If you are younger than 65 but have risk factors, you may benefit from screening.
  • Men: If you are over age 70, you should discuss bone density screening with your primary care doctor. If you are younger than 70 but have risk factors, you may benefit from screening.

What Preventive Steps Can I Take?

Two of the most important steps are to get the daily recommended amounts of calcium and vitamin D, and to regularly engage in weight-bearing, muscle-strengthening exercise. Talk with your primary care doctor for guidance, and read the related articles in this month’s Healthy Tips on nutrition and exercise suggestions for good bone health.

The message Dr. Shailaja Reddy drives home with her patients is one of awareness and prevention. “Get your calcium and exercise, even if you’re in your forties,” she recommends. “If you do this consistently from a younger age it will help you down the road.” Dr. Reddy practices internal medicine at PacMed.

Already diagnosed with osteoporosis? Learn more about the Rheumatology team at PacMed.

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Important Nutrients for Bone Health


Three nutrients important for healthy bones are calcium, vitamin D and magnesium. Here is some useful background, plus some tips on incorporating foods that are rich in these nutrients into your daily diet.(Be sure to consult your doctor for advice regarding appropriate doses of these three nutrients.)

Besides regular weight-bearing exercise (see related article!), getting enough calcium in your diet is a key element to preventing osteoporosis. One general guideline for women who are past menopause is 1,200 mg of calcium each day.

Vitamin D and calcium go hand in hand: without vitamin D, calcium can’t be absorbed. While our bodies synthesize vitamin D through the exposure of our skin to sunlight, that can be tricky in the cloudy Northwest—and even in summer,when you block the sun’s rays with sunscreen. Vitamin D supplements are usually needed, with the recommended daily amount being 600–800 international units.

Magnesium is a mineral, and it plays a critical role in your body, including maintaining healthy bones and a healthy heart. Magnesium exists in your body in significant amounts, with the major portion contained in the skeleton. Deficiencies of this mineral can lead to your bones becoming brittle, which in time increases the risk of fractures. Most people on average need to consume 300–400 milligrams of magnesium a day.

Boosting Your Diet for Good Bone Health

Increasing your intake of dietary sources that are rich in calcium, vitamin D and magnesium can support a personal health goal to maintain strong, resilient bones. As always, work closely with your medical provider to create a care plan that’s right for you.

Calcium. Calcium is found in dairy products (for example, milk, yogurts and cheese), fortified juices, canned salmon and some plant sources such as tofu. Try making “tuna melts” with salmon instead of tuna, or enjoy plain, low-fat yogurt with fresh fruit for a mid-morning snack.

Vitamin D. Vitamin D is in milk and some yogurt and can also be found in eggs, mushrooms and some fortified foods. Starting your day with a hardboiled egg or having a glass of milk instead of your midday soda can help.

Magnesium. Foods rich in magnesium include green leafy vegetables, whole grains, beans and nuts. Fresh fruits and vegetables also provide a modest amount of magnesium.

For more information about PacMed and our dietitian services, please visit www.PacMed.org. To make an appointment, use our appointment tool or call 206.505.1300.

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Fitness 101 for Strong Bones


Bone is living tissue, and it gets stronger when you exercise. Specifically, weight-bearing and muscle-strengthening exercise helps to increase bone density and strength; walking, climbing stairs, jogging, dancing, tennis and lifting weights all fit the bill. These forms of activity also increase coordination and balance, both helpful in preventing falls.

Another term for bone-smart exercise is “resistance training.” Resistance training is any form of exercise that forces the body to overcome an externally applied force. Lifting weights or exercising with elastic bands are good examples: your body must work against the force of the weights or the bands. Over time, resistance training increases your strength, power and bone density.

Weights are a popular form of resistance training. If you’re new to weight lifting, consider working with a trainer to learn proper technique and to slowly build your strength. A few other tips:

  • Be sure to work all major muscle groups—chest, back, legs, shoulders, arms, core. Ideally, do two exercises per muscle group.
  • Stay focused and use your core to stabilize your body’s alignment.
  • Over time, aim for 1–3 sets of 10–15 repetitions.
  • Choose a resistance that heavy enough that the last 2–3 reps are challenging.
  • As you gain agility and strength, consider adding some simple devices to simultaneously improve your balance—like standing on a square of two-inch foam or an inflated rubber balance disc.
  • Be sure to rest for 48 hours between workouts. A good plan is three resistance training sessions per week.

If weights aren’t your love and joy … you might try yoga, martial arts and Tai Chi. These excellent exercise forms combine strength, balance and flexibility. Pilates—whether a mat class or using Pilates equipment with a Pilates trainer—offers a good workout for your core muscles.

Before starting any new exercise activity, consult your primary care provider to make sure it is a good fit for your health situation. Looking for a primary care provider? Explore PacMed Primary Care to learn about family medicine, internal medicine and others options.

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Black-Eyed Peas and Collards


Recipe adapted by Christy Goff, RD, CD

Spring is the perfect time for collards, a healthy green that’s delicious—and a classic dish—with black-eyed peas and bacon. Did you know that black-eyed peas and collard greens have a surprising amount of calcium in them? Just 1 cup of each is equivalent to 2 glasses of milk. And since May is osteoporosis prevention month, enjoy this recipe all month long! For a vegetarian dish, omit bacon and add sautéed tempeh for a crunch.

Serves 4. Prep time 20 minutes; cook time 30–120 minutes.

Ingredients:

1 cup black-eyed peas, dried

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3 strips bacon, cut into small pieces

1 bay leaf

1 bunch collards

Salt and pepper

Directions:

1. Soak the black-eyed peas overnight in 4 cups of water.

2. Heat olive oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, bacon, and bay leaf. Cover the pan with a lid and leave it for 2 minutes. Stir occasionally and cook until the onions are translucent and the bacon is starting to be crispy.

3. Drain black-eyed peas and add to saucepan. Cover peas with just enough water to submerge them and turn heat to medium-low. Cooking time will vary, from 30 minutes to 2 hours, depending on the peas. Peas are done when you can easily squish them on the countertop with the back of a spoon. Check on them every half hour or so, and if water becomes low, add more to cover peas.

4. Wash collards thoroughly and cut out the tough central stems. Chop leaves into bite-sized pieces or tear by hand into small pieces.

5. Once peas are cooked, drain water and put peas back in pan. Add collards to the pot and cover with lid; continue cooking on medium-low. Stir in 1 teaspoon salt and some freshly ground pepper. Cover and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Once collards are tender, turn off heat. Add onion and bacon mixture to serve.

6. Serve dish over rice or with some toast or flatbread.

Nutritional Information (without grain) (1 serving = 1/4 recipe):

Calories: 166, Total Fat 9g, Saturated Fat 2g, Cholesterol 14mg, Sodium: 370mg, Total Carbohydrate: 12g, Dietary Fiber 5g, Sugar: 2g, Fiber: 9g

Source http://www.leannebrown.com.

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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June Wellness Symposium for HR Professionals


Attention HR employees—Save the date for our FREE wellness symposium! PacMed’s Living Well Alliance team is hosting this event to provide you with ideas on ways to enhance your company’s wellness initiatives.

Wellness Symposium
June 22, 10:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

PacMed Beacon Hill campus,
1200 12th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98144

This lively half-day event will include speakers and roundtable sessions on how to get your employees engaged, making your program effective while still watching your budget, helping your workforce prevent injuries and diseases and more!

Look for an official invite in May! You may also email Christy Goff, MS, RDN, CD, for more details.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 1.855.550.8799 for more information or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – APRIL 2017


Topics This Issue:


Know the Signs and Symptoms of Depression


Depression is a common and treatable condition. This brain condition leaves a person feeling sad—but it’s different from normal sadness.

Depression can make it hard to work, concentrate or do everyday tasks. Depression can affect anyone, regardless of age, gender or health situation. It can affect people of any race or ethnic group.

What Are the Symptoms of Depression?

People with depression feel down most of the time for periods lasting at least two weeks. They also have at least one of these symptoms:

  • No longer enjoy or care about doing the things they used to like to do
  • Feel sad, down, irritable, hopeless or cranky most of the day, almost every day

Depression can also make people:

  • Lose or gain weight.
  • Sleep too much or too little.
  • Feel tired or have no energy.
  • Feel guilty or worthless.
  • Forget things or feel confused.
  • Think about death or suicide.

Are There Treatment Options?

Safe and effective treatments for depression are available. They include seeing a psychotherapist, taking medications or a combination. Talk with your primary care provider to decide what options are right for you.

As you recover, remember that taking good care of yourself can also help boost your emotional state. Specifically, get regular exercise, like walking briskly or cycling three to five times each week. Be sure to eat a healthy and balanced diet. Avoid drugs and alcohol; they can worsen depression symptoms.

Finally, reach out to friends and family whom you are comfortable with. Talking openly and surrounding yourself with supportive, understanding people is important for recovery.

Learn more about our Behavioral Medicine team at PacMed. Our team of licensed therapists offers individual, couples and family therapy. They also can help with medication management and provide psychiatric evaluation. To make an appointment, use our appointment tool or call 206.621.4045.

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Are You or Someone You Know in Crisis?


If you are thinking about suicide or hurting yourself, help is available:

  • In an emergency, call 9-1-1
  • Go to the emergency room at your local hospital
  • Call the King County 24-Hour Crisis Line: 1 (866) 427-4747
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1 (800) 273-8255
  • Call your health care provider and tell them it is urgent

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Is My Son Depressed, or Just Lazy?


By Jack Shriner, LICSW, CMHS

I have been asked this question by many parents with sons in middle and high school. In fact, this question often brings a family in for an initial appointment with a psychotherapist. Although I mostly hear from mothers worried about their sons, my thoughts apply well to fathers and daughters, too.

A mother will express concern that her son has been withdrawn, holed up in his room, eyes glued to his Xbox. He seems more irritable. Also, his grades may be lower than last year, he doesn’t spend as much time with friends, and it’s like pulling teeth to get him to do his household chores—let alone get ready for school in the morning.

So, does the son have a psychiatric condition that needs treatment? Or is he just pulling a fast one to get out of doing work? For parents, this often leads to another question: do I respond with concern or with discipline?

First, be sure to review the typical signs of clinical depression in the accompanying article.

It is important to remember that—aside from statements about suicide or evidence of self-harm—it’s perfectly normal for anyone to experience one or two of these things from time to time. We start talking about depression only when the symptoms are ongoing and excessive, and they cause clear problems with a child’s functioning at home or school.

So, let’s say your child is showing some signs of depression. You can be a positive influence. For starters, drop the word lazy from your vocabulary. The best way to change a child’s behavior is to encourage the behavior you want, not to criticize the behavior you don’t want. Using negative labels like “lazy” is more likely to discourage your son and may even confirm thoughts that he’s not living up to your expectations.

The bottom line is that good parenting involves a constant dance between concern and discipline. This dance is challenging, and no parent is always going to get it right. If you suspect your pre-teen or teenage son is depressed, consider the following responses:

  • Think of discipline as teaching, not punishment. Keep a calm, neutral tone when setting and enforcing rules.
  • Help your son make a plan for coping positively with sadness or stress. For example, consider using art, writing, music, exercise, relaxation, or outings.
  • Share how you deal with feelings that arise in your life, such as frustration after a hard day at work.
  • Limit factors in your son’s environment that seem to trigger negative feelings. For example, if you feel the Xbox is not helping, relocate it to the living room and limit his use.

Other circumstances such as grief, drug use or a condition called hypothyroidism can cause symptoms similar to depression. These should be ruled out by a health professional and treated appropriately.

Seek out a psychotherapist for additional help if needed. Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions!

Jack Shriner, LICSW, CMHS, is a licensed clinical social worker at Pacific Medical Centers at Beacon Hill. For more information about Jack and our other Behavioral Medicine providers, please visit www.PacMed.org. To make an appointment, use our appointment tool or call 206.621.4045.

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How Vitamin D May Affect Depression


It’s no secret that vitamin D contributes to the development and maintenance of healthy, strong bones. But did you know that it is also being researched for its effects on depression?

Here Comes the Sun!

Our bodies naturally synthesize vitamin D when exposed to sunlight. All you need for a week’s worth of vitamin D is 15 to 20 minutes in the sun. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium, which supports the development and maintenance of healthy bones. This is critical in children as they grow. Adults also need vitamin D and calcium to prevent osteoporosis, or brittle bones, as they age.

While we’ve known about the connection between vitamin D and calcium for some time, more recent research is looking into the connection of vitamin D to depression. It is possible that this vitamin may play a role in improving symptoms of depression and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Other research has shown that vitamin D may also improve muscle recovery, help prevent soreness and aching, and help with immune function.

You can get small amounts of vitamin D from foods including fish, eggs and fortified milk, but for people living in the Seattle area, it’s hard to get enough vitamin D without taking a supplement, particularly during winter.

Balancing Vitamins and Sunshine

The Institute of Medicine recommends a minimum daily allowance of 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day and 800 IU per day for people over age 70. People living in the Pacific Northwest may need more than this due to our limited exposure to the sun, particularly during winter.

Lisa Sieberson, DNP, ARNP, recommends to her patients that they take a daily vitamin D supplement with 1000 to 2000 IU to ensure sufficient vitamin D levels.

During the summer months, when the sun does come out in Seattle, it is easier to get those 15 to 20 minutes of sunshine per week. However, keep in mind that sunscreen blocks the UV light that allows our skin to synthesize vitamin D.

She doesn’t advise going into direct sunlight for extended periods of time without sunscreen, especially for those who are fair skinned or have other risk factors for skin cancer. For this reason, it may be worthwhile to take vitamin D supplements all year round.

Some people are more susceptible to low vitamin D than others. People with darker skin tones need more sunlight to synthesize enough vitamin D. Breast-fed infants are also prone to vitamin D deficiency because breast milk does not usually contain a sufficient amount of vitamin D and infants should not be exposed to direct sunlight.

Seattle’s latitude and propensity for cloudy days make it hard for all of us to get enough vitamin D, so if you’ve got the rainy-day blues and aren’t already taking vitamin D, you might want to consider a supplement to boost your vitamin D. Talk with your doctor!

Learn more about the author, Lisa Sieberson, DNP, ARNP or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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Lemon-Garlic Salmon Foil Pack with Green Beans and New Potatoes


Salmon has never been easier to cook, wrapped up in a packet to bake in the oven. As a bonus, crunchy green beans and garlicky potato slices are added for a complete meal.

Serves 4. Serving size one filet. Prep time 30 minutes; cook time 20 minutes.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound new potatoes
  • 2 teaspoons garlic, minced
  • 1 pound green beans, ends trimmed
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 six-ounce skinless salmon filets
  • 1 to 2 lemons, sliced into wheels

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Make four sheets of aluminum foil about 30 inches long. Fold the foil in half widthwise (into almost a square) so it's extra sturdy.

2. Cut each potato into half lengthwise. Thinly cut each half into ⅛-inch slices and place into a heatproof container. Stir in the minced garlic, cover and cook the potatoes in the microwave until halfway tender, around 90 seconds to 3 minutes, depending on microwave’s power. Transfer mixture to a bowl, along with green beans, oil, salt and pepper. Mix to combine.

3. Divide potato mixture into 4 equal portions and place in the center of each foil square. If possible, nudge green beans to face the same direction. Top each portion with a salmon fillet, aligning with green beans for easier folding. Top with 2 lemon wheels.

4. Securely seal the top and sides of each foil packet. Place each packet onto a large baking sheet and put in oven. Cook until salmon is cooked through, about 20 minutes.

5. Remove from oven and place each foil packet onto a plate. Carefully open each packet to serve.

Nutritional Information (1 serving = 1 packet, or 1/4 of recipe):

Calories: 394, Total Fat: 15g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Cholesterol: 79.5mg, Sodium: 286mg, Total Carbohydrates: 23.1g, Sugars: 4.4g, Dietary Fiber: 5.1g, Protein: 40.4g

Recipe © 2016 American Heart Association.

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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New Spring Classes from the Living Well Alliance


Classes from the Living Well Alliance help local organizations provide wellness programming to their employees. Their 45- to 60-minute classes are interactive, fun, current—an easy fit for your worksite.

This spring, we are rolling out a two new Take a Break to Educate classes:

  • Participants in our new Quick, Healthy Meals class will gain skills to help them pull together nutritious meals when there is no time to spare. Together, we will discuss how to plan a meal, be efficient in the grocery store and cut corners in the kitchen to save time, dirty dishes and sanity.
  • In Brain Boost, participants will learn ways to help protect their brain against memory decline as they age. The class will touch on various nutrition and lifestyle factors.

Our up-to-date, research-based topics can help you promote health and disease prevention among your employees. All classes are taught by qualified health professionals.

Learn more at the Living Well Alliance website. For the latest class information, click the Take a Break to Educate button for class descriptions and the Program and Services button for pricing.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 1.855.550.8799 for more information or send us an email.

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – MARCH 2017


Topics This Issue:


Colorectal Cancer Risks and Prevention


In 2017, the American Cancer Society predicts some 135,000 new cases of colorectal cancer and about 50,000 deaths. But this doesn’t have to be the case! The disease is largely preventable with regular screening and is treatable with early detection.

If you are over 50 or have a family history of colorectal cancer, talk to your doctor about getting screened today. The more you know, the better you can take care of your health.

Colorectal Cancer Signs & Symptoms

Colorectal cancer—also commonly called colon cancer—often has no symptoms. This is why screening is so important. These symptoms, however, might indicate colorectal cancer:

  • Blood in your stools
  • Unexplained abdominal pain
  • Unexplained change in bowel habits
  • Unexplained anemia
  • Unexplained weight loss

Screening/Early Detection

Colon cancer is mostly preventable with regular screening. Screening can help catch colon cancer at an early, curable stage. It also gives your care team the ability to find and remove precancerous polyps.

Beginning at age 50, both men and women who are at average risk for developing colorectal cancer should have a screening colonoscopy and then repeat the procedure every 10 years. All men and women are at risk for colorectal cancer. However, African Americans, Hispanics and Ashkenazi Jews (people of Eastern European descent) are at a higher risk for the disease than other populations.

Understand Your Insurance Coverage

Before you get your screening, be sure to talk with your insurance company about your coverage for a colonoscopy. It’s important to understand your insurance coverage for a routine, preventive colonoscopy screening—but also your coverage if a biopsy or polyp is removed during your screening.

Learn more about colonoscopies at PacMed and our colonoscopy specialist, Michele Pulling, MD, including her practice philosophy and special interests. Or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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A Colonoscopy Is Easier Than You Think


A colonoscopy could save your life! When colorectal cancer is detected early, it can be treated. But many people avoid getting a colonoscopy because they feel embarrassed or afraid. Here’s what to expect.

A colonoscopy is a medical screening that checks your colon for cancer and any polyps (unusual growths). To do the screening, the doctor uses a thin, flexible scope that has a light and a small camera on the end. The procedure usually lasts just 15–30 minutes.

For the vast majority of patients, a colonoscopy is easy or mildly uncomfortable. The benefit can be enormous—life-saving, in fact! Learn more by talking with your primary care provider or gastroenterologist.

At-Home Preparation

The preparation you do at home in the days before your colonoscopy are key to a successful screening. If you don’t understand any part of the instructions, be sure to ask your doctor or nurse.

The colon must be empty and clean before the screening. So, for several days before the procedure, you will follow a limited diet. On the day before the screening, you will drink large amounts of a laxative, to ensure your colon is empty. (You will need to be at home on this day because you will use the bathroom frequently.) For the last half-day or night, you will consume only clear fluids.

Finally, be sure to enlist a friend or family member to drive you home from the screening. You cannot take a cab or other service.

During the Colonoscopy

You will be lightly sedated so you relax. You will probably feel sleepy. Most people, in fact, are unable to remember the procedure afterward.

During the screening, you will be covered with a drape. The doctor will examine the walls of your colon using the scope. If you are awake, the doctor will let you know what to expect and check on your comfort. If the doctor finds some small polyps (growths), those may be removed because some polyps can become cancerous over time. If the doctor finds larger polyps, those will be removed and sent to the lab for testing.

Learn more about colonoscopies at PacMed and our colonoscopy specialist, Michele Pulling, MD, including her practice philosophy and special interests. Or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

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Baked Apple with Oat Crumble


Warm apples and a crispy topping make this a comforting and healthy dessert. Leave the skin on the apples for a dose of fiber, and serve with a small scoop of vanilla yogurt, if desired.

Serves 4. Serving size ½ apple. Prep time 15 minutes; cook time 60 minutes.

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium apples (such as Gala, Fuji, Honey Crisp or Pink Lady)
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped pecans
  • 2 tablespoons uncooked regular oats
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cold butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground pumpkin pie spice
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 orange, juiced (use some orange zest to add brightness to the finish product)

Optional: Serve with a dollop of vanilla yogurt

Preparation:

1. Preheat the oven to 350° F.

2. Cut each apple in half horizontally (so the stem is in one half and the flower end is in the other). Use a spoon to remove most of the core from each half, leaving about a half-inch of apple in the floor of the rounded hole.

3. Use your fingers to combine nuts, oats, brown sugar, butter, spices and salt,until mixture resembles coarse meal. Fill each apple half with about 2 tablespoons of the mixture.

4. Place apples in an 8-inch baking dish; pour orange juice around apples in dish. Cover with aluminum foil. Bake 30 minutes. Sprinkle a small amount of orange zest on top for color (optional)

5. Remove foil, and bake an additional 30 minutes or until apples are tender and easily pierced with a toothpick. (Baking time will vary depending on variety, size and ripeness of apples.)

Nutritional Information (without yogurt):

Calories: 101, Total Fat: 4g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Cholesterol: 8mg, Sodium: 100mg, Total Carbohydrates: 17g, Sugars: 11g, Fiber: 3g, Protein: 1g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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Eat More Fiber for Digestive Health


By Christine Stirparo, RDN, CD

Are you getting enough fiber in your diet? Adequate fiber intake can help lower cholesterol levels, keep blood sugar levels under control and prevent constipation and diverticulosis.

A high-fiber diet is also usually lower in calories and can increase feelings of fullness after meals, which can help promote a healthy weight. So, how much fiber do we need? What are good sources?

The recommended amount of fiber is 25g per day for women (21g over age 51) and 38g per day for men (30g over age 51). Unfortunately, most Americans fall far short of the recommended amount.

Fiber is found in plant foods such as fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, and whole-grain products.

Try these simple substitutions to increase the amount of fiber in your diet:

  • Have steel cut oats with nuts and berries for breakfast instead of cereal.
  • At lunchtime, choose bread products that say “whole wheat” as one of the first ingredients and add vegetables such as tomatoes, cucumber and spinach to sandwiches or wraps.
  • Add more vegetables or beans to casseroles and stews.
  • Try brown rice or wheat pasta instead of white rice or pasta.
  • Snack on fruits and vegetables during the day instead of packaged snacks from home or the vending machine.

As you increase the fiber in your diet, do it gradually and drink plenty of fluids. You may experience constipation and nausea if you consume more than your usual amount of fiber without adequate fluid intake.

Have questions about fiber and nutrition? Our primary care providers can help. PacMed also has dietitians who can help you fine-tune your diet.

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New Year, New PacMed Clinics


Pacific Medical Centers expands its proven model of quality care to south Puget Sound.

“The

The new PacMed Lacey clinic opened December 5, 2016. (Photo by Michael Cole)

As our region grows, so grows the challenge of finding reliable health care options. Fortunately for those living in the south Puget Sound area, two new PacMed clinics opened in 2016—and more locations are on the way.

Our newest clinics—Lakewood opened in May, and Lacey in December—both offer patients our trade mark high-end service and convenience. You can schedule same-day primary care appointments at both locations, and our providers will coordinate any specialty care you might need. Plus, PacMed accepts most major health insurance plans, including Health Exchange options.

“We are pleased to join the Lakewood and Lacey communities,” says PacMed CEO Linda Marzano. “We believe those residents will find value in our proven, low-cost, high-quality care model, which creates positive outcomes for patients and helps them to live their healthiest lives.”

“PacMed offers a patient-centric approach to care that encourages collaboration between patients and providers, as well as within our care teams,” says Dr. Rick Ludwig, Medical Director, US Family Health Plan. “We find that this collaboration, along with a focus on prevention, leads to a better, more personalized experience for our patients.”

The Lakewood and Lacey clinics also offer greater access to care for military families associated with nearby Joint Base Lewis-McChord. PacMed is the only West Coast provider of US Family Health Plan (USFHP) and has been serving the local military community for more than 30 years. USFHP provides active-duty family members and retired military personnel with a civilian option to health care at no added cost. Our military patients routinely express high satisfaction with their overall PacMed experience.

With its expansion into Pierce and Thurston counties, PacMed now operates11 clinics in the greater Puget Sound area. In the last three years, PacMed has increased the number of patients it treats from about 87,000 to more than 100,000.

We invite you to stop by and visit us soon! Our Lakewood clinic is located at 7424 Bridgeport Way W, Suite 201(phone 253.984.2600). Our Lacey clinic is at 4800 College Street SE (phone360.486.2800). You can request an appointment online at http://www.PacMed.org/schedule or by calling 1.888.4PACMED(1.888.472.2633).

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Wellness Consultations from The Living Well Alliance


Eat! Sleep! Be Merry! The wellness consultations offered by our Living Well Alliance at your worksite deliver all this—and more.

If your employees want to change behaviors to achieve better health, the best place to begin is with focused information delivered by trustworthy professionals. The Living Well Alliance is passionate about supporting your employees. Our programs can help them eat healthier, sleep better and find ways to be at their best health one step at a time—and many of our wellness programs are complimentary.

The Living Well Alliance offers complimentary consultations to employers and other organizations. By meeting with your HR director, we can determine which of our lunchtime classes, confidential screenings, health fairs and other offerings are best suited to your wellness goals. All of our programs and services are led by a nurse, dietitian or other health professional. Employees always have the opportunity to ask our staff questions.

The Living Well Alliance is run by Pacific Medical Centers. Call us today at 206.621.4419 for more information or send us an email.

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – JANUARY 2017


Topics This Issue:


Walk Your Way to Better Health


Why let wintery weather sidetrack your exercise goals? It’s time to bundle up, put on your walking shoes and explore our spectacular scenery. Dr. Ari Gilmore offers this advice on how to get moving.

One great aspect of walking is that you can do it in any weather—without investing in expensive equipment or joining an athletic club. Walking 30 to 60 minutes daily at a moderate pace burns fat, lowers blood pressure and strengthens bones, muscles and joints. It may also reduce risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, various cancers and osteoporosis.

If you are just starting a walking program:

  • See your doctor if you don’t currently exercise, have diabetes or high blood pressure, or are over 65.
  • Get fitted for a good pair of walking or running shoes.
  • Dress in layers so you can respond to changing conditions.
  • Stay hydrated. Carry water if it’s warm or you’ll walk for more than an hour.

When walking, don’t lean forward or backward. Stand straight, relax your shoulders, and bend your arms and swing them to add power to your walk. If you are feeling out of shape, start slowly and add a few minutes to your walk each date. If you have a pedometer or fitness monitor, begin with 2,000 to 3,000 steps a day and build from there.

If you experience pain in your feet or elsewhere, try resting up for a day. If you see swelling or bruising, treat it with rest, ice, compression and elevation (often referred to as RICE). If symptoms persist beyond 48 hours, make an appointment with your doctor.

Here's to your winter explorations!

Ari Gilmore, MD, is a family medicine physician at our Beacon Hill clinic. Learn more about Dr. Gilmore at www.PacMed.org, or call 206.326.2400 for an appointment.

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Keep Fit as a Family


Ever wish your kids would stop staring at a screen and be more active? You’re not alone.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) estimates that today’s children are spending an average of seven hours a day on entertainment media, including television, computers, phones and other electronics. By contrast, AAP recommends one to two hours of screen time a day.

Here are six simple steps to get your kids unplugged and moving.

1. Make a family media plan—a written set of rules and guidelines.Include specifics about time limits, device curfews, guidelines for information not to be accessed or shared on the Internet, as well as consequences for not following house rules.

2. Keep all screens in public spaces and out of bedrooms. Set up an “overnight charging station,” where everyone’s mobile devices are docked for the night and out of reach.

3. Be a role model. Set a good example by curbing your own screen-use time. Replace it with family activities or exercise.

4. Encourage and get involved in physical activities the whole family can enjoy. Go ice skating, cross-country skiing or sledding, or visit a community center for a swim or cardio class.

5. Get outdoors and enjoy the fresh air. Venture out on a family hike, walk to a nearby park or go birdwatching.

6. Teach your kids the nutritional value of food. Encourage healthy snacks and make sure your active family stays well hydrated by drinking plenty of water.

To learn more about PacMed pediatricians, or call for an appointment, 1.888.4PACMED.

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5 Tips to Restore Harmony


1. Evaluate your current work-life balance. Over the course of a week, monitor your daily tasks and activities, and take notes. This will give you a snapshot of your current situation and help you make a plan for moving forward.

2. Use a calendar or to-do list as your personal assistant, to minimize the time you spend running in circles.

3. Move your body. Book a series of “exercise dates” every week.

4. Unplug from technology, especially at dinnertime and at least one hour before going to bed.

5. Prioritize time for rest and recharging. Schedule activities that energize you—and be sure to get a good night’s sleep.

Sometimes we all need a helping hand. If you’re feeling stressed or like your life is out of balance, explore the treatment options provided by our Behavioral Medicine team.

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Soothing Miso Soup


Recipe adapted by Christy Goff, RD, CD

Easy miso soup is full of healing vegetables and probiotics to help ward off winter illness. Any type of miso paste works; yellow or white offer a mellower taste, while red is the boldest, saltiest flavor.

Serves 4. Serving size 1 cup. Prep time 20 minutes.

Ingredients:

4 tablespoons low-sodium miso (a fermented soybean paste, found in the refrigerated case at most grocery stores, preferably lower salt like Organic Miso Master)

4 cups water, divided as 3½ cups + ½ cup

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ cup shitake mushrooms, sliced

1 teaspoon dried wakame (an edible seaweed), chopped

½ block soft tofu, cut into ½" cubes

2 green onions, sliced

Bean sprouts, sesame seed and toasted sesame oil for garnish

Preparation:

1. In a bowl, whisk miso into ½ cup warm water and stir until diluted. Set aside.

2. Heat olive oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Sauté mushrooms 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned.

3. While mushrooms cook, bring 3½ cups water to a simmer in a large saucepan.

4. To saucepan, add mushrooms, wakame, tofu and green onion. Heat throughout.

5. Add miso and water mixture to pot of water and vegetables. Note:To avoid damaging the probiotics in the miso, be careful to not bring soup to a boil.

6. Transfer into a serving bowl. Add desired amount of bean sprouts and sesame seed, plus a few drops of toasted sesame oil.

Nutritional information per serving:

Calories: 120Fat: 6 gSodium: 180 mgCarbohydrate: 8 gFiber: 2 gProtein: 7 g

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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The Living Well Alliance—Meet Our New Staff!


As we enter 2017, the Living Well Alliance™ would like to share some exciting changes to our staffing, class topics and pricing options.

First, welcome to Christy Goff, registered dietitian, and Pamela Barber, community liaison. Our team will continue to help you reach your company’s employee wellness goals by providing complimentary services for biometric screenings and health fairs. Please note that the cost for an individual “Take a Break to Educate” class has increased. This small increase, however, enables us to offer more variety in class topics and to host webinars for your organization. Check out our new class packages for additional savings! All classes are taught by our registered dietitian (RD) and registered nurse (RN).Meet the LWA staff and learn about our programs and services.

The Living Well Alliance offers employers on-site wellness education and free health screenings for their employees.

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

HEALTH TIPS – FEBRUARY 2017


Topics This Issue:


Take Steps to Prevent Heart Disease


Heart disease is the top killer in the United States for many reasons, but you can fight back and take charge of your cardiovascular health.

First, what does heart disease refer to? Most people immediately think of issues caused by the hardening or narrowing of arteries. These include angina, myocardial infarction (“heart attack”) and sudden cardiac death. You might think of these as “plumbing” problems. Heart disease also refers to electrical problems such as irregular heart rhythms and mechanical issues such as heart valve problems. The heart has many integrated systems that all need to work well together for proper function.

The following recommendations apply to all types of heart disease.

1. Know Your Numbers

In study after study, the best treatments revolve around focusing on addressing the risk factors for heart disease. “Your numbers” are measurements of some key risk factors. Knowing your numbers and setting target goals is the first step in taking charge of your heart health. Talk with your primary care provider or cardiologist about these lab values and lifestyle factors:

  • LDL and HDL
  • Blood pressure
  • Diabetes/HbA1c
  • Body mass index
  • Smoker?

You can even print a wallet sized card to record your numbers and your goals!

2. Find a Communicative Doctor

Successful cardiovascular care depends on good communication. So if you are concerned about your heart health, take the time to find a cardiologist you can talk with. Your cardiologist should answer your questions and clearly explain your diagnosis, test results and treatment options.

Also, don’t be afraid to ask for a second opinion! Information is power, and getting a second viewpoint can help you make the right decisions.

3. Build a Team

Knowing that you are not alone in your fight for improved health can decrease stress and worry. Involve your family as much as possible; they can be an invaluable resource. Bring your friends on board too. They can support you in any diet or exercise goals you have.

Also, don’t be afraid to ask for a second opinion! Information is power, and getting a second viewpoint can help you make the right decisions.

Take Care of the Machine

Finally, recognize that your heart is an engine, working inside of a bigger machine. Treat the machine well by eating well, exercising and making sleep a priority. This will help bring your numbers to goal and keep you tuned into your health. (Be sure to consult with your primary care physician before starting a new exercise program.)

Learn more about the PacMed Cardiology team at www.PacMed.org, or call 206.505.1300 for an appointment.

Heart Attack and Stroke: Do You Know the Symptoms?

While crushing chest pain is the most recognized heart attack symptom in both men and women, as many as one-third of female heart attack patients never experience any chest pain.

Women’s heart attack symptoms may look different. Every woman should learn the signs of heart attack in females and take them seriously.

Most common heart attack signs in women:

  • Chest pain or pressure
  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Indigestion
  • Sudden pain or discomfort in the back, arm, neck, jaw or stomach
  • Sudden lightheadedness or cold sweats
  • Sleep disturbances

If you have been experiencing unusual discomfort in your limbs or torso on a continual basis, call your doctor today. If any of these symptoms comes on suddenly, with no identifiable cause, call 911 immediately. Do not wait more than five minutes. Do not attempt to drive yourself for help.

Most common stroke signs in men and women:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body)
  • Sudden trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking; dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

With these stroke symptoms, call even if the signs have stopped. If treated within three hours, the long-term disability from some common types of stroke can be reduced or avoided.

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Delicious Butternut Squash Soup


Recipe adapted by Christy Goff, MS, RDN, CD

This colorful, mellow soup delivers vegetables and all their nutrients in a tasty, warm bowl.

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 3 to 4 pounds butternut squash, peeled and seeded (also can use frozen)
  • 2 yellow onions
  • 2 green apples, peeled and cored
  • 3 tablespoons good olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 to 4 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon good curry powder

Optional Condiments:

  • Scallions, white and green parts, trimmed and sliced diagonally
  • Flaked sweetened coconut, lightly toasted
  • Roasted salted cashews, toasted and chopped

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 425° F. Cut the squash, onions and apples in 1-inch cubes.
2. Toss with the olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper.
3. Divide the squash mixture between 2 sheet pans and spread it in a single layer. Roast for 35 to 45 minutes, until very tender. (If using frozen squash, roast only the apples and onions in the oven until soft and thaw the squash in the microwave 3-5 minutes or until soft.)
4. When the vegetables are done, put them through a blender or food processor fitted with the steel blade. Add some of the vegetable stock and puree to the texture you desire. When all of the vegetables are processed, place them in a large pot and add enough vegetable stock to make a thick soup. Add the curry powder, salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot with condiments either on the side or on top of each serving.

Nutritional Information (1 serving = 1/6 of recipe):

Calories: 217, Fat 7g, Sodium: 343mg, Carbohydrate: 29g, Sugar: 13g, Fiber: 7g, Protein: 3g

(Nutritional information does not include optional condiments)

More recipes online! Go to www.PacMed.org/recipes.

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Tips for Staying Healthy During Flu Season


By Dr. Ari Gilmore, MD

When the Washington State House of Representatives passed a bill that guaranteed sick leave to employees at companies with more than four employees, Dr. Ari Gilmore was thrilled.

“As doctors, we have a problem with people’s great work ethic, especially if they’re actively coughing,” he says. Dr. Gilmore offers several tips on how to stay healthy during flu season and what to do if you’ve come down with a cold.

Regular hand washing is critical, especially after being in a public place because germs can live on surfaces for a long time. “Avoid touching your face or rubbing your eyes,” he says.

Exercise can also help. “There has been some evidence that regular exercise keeps the immune system up,” says Gilmore. “Also, regular exposure to sauna-type temperatures makes a difference. The elevated body temperature may decrease the activity of a virus. A couple of studies have shown it to impact mild to moderate cold symptoms. So a good day at the gym with a sauna afterward might be good preventive medicine.”

A flu shot is the best bet, especially for people who work in jobs that demand high-volume contact with the public. “Making sure you get your flu shot is probably the most important preventive step,” Gilmore explains.

When to Visit Your Doctor

If you’ve contracted a cold, the best thing to do is stay home—including from your health clinic—at least for the first three days. “If you don’t have a fever, I recommend staying home for the first two or three days. A top mistake is to visit your doctor right away and infect others,” says Gilmore. “Often, we have people coming in on day two. At that point, we don’t have a whole lot of treatment to offer, and you’re just going to spread it around. If it’s been over three days, come in, and we’ll listen to the lung and make sure it hasn’t turned into pneumonia.”

On the flip side, waiting too long to see a doctor can also be problematic. “We’ve had people who’ve had a fever for five or seven days, and by the time they come in, they’re quite ill,” says Gilmore. “For most people, a temperature is going to be resolved in three days. If it’s not, have it checked out.”

The exceptions are those who are at higher risk, including anyone over 65, children under age four with a fever over 101 degrees, or those dealing with other illnesses. “For those particular populations, there are effective treatments like Tamiflu,” says Gilmore. “It’s worth talking to your doctor about.”

Dr. Gilmore practices family medicine at the PacMed Beacon Hill clinic.

For more videos of providers about the flu click here Dr. Bowles, Dr. Bressie, Dr. Gilmore.

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Try the Heart-Healthy DASH Diet


In the spirit of this heart-healthy month, let’s explore the DASH diet. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, which is another term for high blood pressure.

This eating plan is well researched for its powerful effect on lowering blood pressure by using food’s own nutrients (specifically potassium, calcium and magnesium). This is why the DASH diet recommends eating more—that is, more of foods that are high in these nutrients!

Specifically, the DASH diet encourages you to increase your intake of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds, and legumes.The plan also encourages you to eat less—less salt, saturated fat, red meat, sweets and sugary beverages, all of which negatively affect blood pressure.

What’s the Big Deal with High Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure is a measure of the force of blood hitting against the walls of your arteries (the vessels around your heart). When blood pressure is too high (> 140/90) for an extended period of time, it puts too much strain on the heart, and the heart cannot effectively pump blood around the body. High blood pressure also contributes to atherosclerosis (the hardening of the arteries), which increases your risk for strokes and congestive heart failure, kidney failure and blindness.

Getting Started with DASH
A good way to start is to simply observe and keep track of your current eating habits. Write down what you eat, how much, when and why. You’ll quickly be able to see where you can start making changes. For example, just decreasing your salt intake while increasing your vegetable intake can have a big impact on lowering blood pressure!

Use these DASH guidelines to find a balance of more nutritious foods and less salty, processed foods.

Increase!

• More fruits and vegetables (4-5 servings of each per day). Choose fresh, frozen or canned with no salt added.

∗ To increase flavor, sprinkle vinegar or citrus, add fresh or dried herbs or spices, and try salt-free seasoning blends.

• More whole grains (7-8 servings)—such as whole wheat bread/wraps/pasta, oatmeal and brown rice. Cook without salt, and cut back on instant or flavored mixes.

• More unsalted nuts and seeds (4-5 one-ounce servings per week). Add your own flavorings such as cinnamon for sweet or cayenne pepper for spice.

• More beans/legumes (1-2 servings per week). If canned, rinse to remove extra salt, and add lemon or lime juice to keep them tasty.

• More fresh poultry, fish and lean meat (rather than canned or processed types).

Decrease!

• Cut back on frozen dinners, pizza, canned soups or broths.

• Eat less of premixed salad dressings. Make your own with a mixture of olive oil and vinegar, plus a spice or two.

• Buy low- or reduced-sodium or no-salt-added versions of foods and condiments.


(The above recommended intake amounts for the DASH diet are based on 2000 calorie diet.)

Along with choosing a DASH approach to eating, you can make other lifestyle factors to decrease blood pressure. These include maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, drinking less alcohol and taking prescribed drugs as needed. Talk with your provider! And learn more about the DASH diet at the American Heart Association site.

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What Our Biometric Health Screening Can Do for You!


Brought to you by the Living Well Alliance

In general, health screenings give you insight into your current health status so you can take charge of your health and get the care you need.

A biometric health screening measures physical characteristics such as height, weight, body mass index, blood pressure, blood cholesterol and fitness. This screening evaluates an individual’s health status and provides a benchmark that can be used to track changes over time.

Biometric health screenings offered by the Living Well Alliance are conducted by trained health professionals at your worksite. The screening examines your risk for diabetes and heart disease, two leading health issues facing Americans today. Due to their insidious nature, these chronic diseases often go undiagnosed. But with early screenings and regular primary care visits, they can be treated and managed—and sometimes avoided all together.

This Living Well Alliance biometric health screening is confidential, complimentary to employer groups and takes only 15 minutes per person. Participants also have the opportunity to ask questions of our registered dietitian or nurse.

Learn more about scheduling a worksite biometric screening for employees with the Living Well Alliance. You may also contact Christy Goff, RD, by email or at 206.621.4419

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

PacMed's “Healthy Tips” e-newsletter has great tips to help you get—and stay—healthy!

Inside The Latest Issue:

  • Find and Treat Diabetes Early
  • Think of Exercise as Diabetes “Medicine”
  • Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating
  • Stuffed Acorn Squash Recipe
  • Diabetes Screenings from The Living Well Alliance

Read the latest issue here.


To sign up to receive Healthy Tips and Healthy Today by email or mail, visit our sign-up page.


Healthy Tips Archives:

2017
November 2017 Issue

October 2017 Issue

September 2017 Issue

August 2017 Issue

June 2017 Issue

May 2017 Issue

April 2017 Issue

March 2017 Issue

February 2017 Issue

January 2017 Issue

2016
2016, Issue 1 - Men

2016, Issue 1 - Women

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

5 Ways to Keep Your Heart Healthy This Summer

Heart disease is still the leading cause of death in the US, and women especially tend to underestimate how susceptible they are to the disease. Let’s make the gorgeous weather, delicious summer foods and fun activities work for your heart!

Our favorite tips just for you:

  • Have fun with exercise!
    It’s easier to embrace daily exercise when you look forward to it. Giving your heart a gentle workout doesn’t have to be trudging on a treadmill, looking at a wall in the gym. It can be any physical activity you enjoy. If you like walking, find a new path to explore in your neighborhood or a flat nature trail you haven’t tried yet.

    Do you like to garden? An hour of digging and planting can burn up to 272 calories for a 150-pound person.

    Give yourself credit for daily chores. Even activities such as household cleaning, sweeping a walkway or doing laundry can count as heart-healthy exercise.
  • Sleuth out hidden sugars and embrace the sweet fruits of summer.
    How does sugar affect heart health? The American Heart Association reports that consuming 17-21 percent of calories as sugar gives people a 38 percent increased risk for heart disease. Secret sugars are everywhere in your kitchen.

    Keep an eye out for ingredients like high-fructose corn syrup, corn sweetener, molasses, cane sugar, honey and sugar molecules ending in “ose” such as dextrose, sucrose and maltose. The big culprits include spaghetti sauce, barbecue sauce, grocery store side dishes like coleslaw and macaroni salads—and cocktail mixers, a summertime favorite.

    Once you’ve identified which foods have added sugars, you can begin trying to cut back. Delicious, ripe fruits of summer and fresh-made juice are an easy way to avoid added sugar. And when baking, consider halving the sugar added to recipe; you might not even notice!
  • Find ways to de-stress.
    Stress is natural in moderate levels and something that most people experience. However, high levels or long periods of stress can have negative effects on heart health. So it’s important to find time in your daily routine to check in on stress and look for ways to reduce it.

    The world’s easiest stress-reliever is to get enough sleep! Activities like meditation, yoga or taking a walk instantly help. If those aren’t for you, try calling a friend, spending time with a pet or writing in a journal to relieve stress.
  • Get regular checkups.
    Early summer is a great time to get a checkup because it gives you a baseline for improvement. It’s no one’s favorite activity, but regular checkups are a crucial part of maintaining heart health.

    Heart-health screenings look at blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, body mass index and other measurements that help paint a picture of the condition of your heart.

    Seeing your doctor regularly can help you catch early warning signs so you can make lifestyle adjustments that improve heart health.
  • Easy, healthy summer meals.
    Meals that are low in saturated fat and low in sugar reduce the risk of heart disease—and summer is an incredibly easy time to accomplish this tip! Consider vegetable kabobs on the barbecue, crisp green vegetables and salads. Eat a kaleidoscope of food colors for the best health: purple beets, red tomatoes, green broccoli, yellow peppers. The whole family benefits from this one!

Have fun this summer and help keep your heart healthy at the same time by keeping these tips in mind!


 

5 Things to Consider When Choosing Sunscreen

Summer is right around the corner, now is a good time take stock of your sun protection from last summer.

Keep these tips in mind to help choose and use an effective sunscreen:

1) Look for the words "broad spectrum" on the label.
The two types of UV light in sunshine than can damage your skin are called UVA and UVB rays. Sunscreen labeled as “broad spectrum” protects against both types of rays. Only sunscreens that protect against both are allowed to advertise the words “broad spectrum” on the label.

2) If you have sensitive skin, study the ingredients.
Some sunscreens include fragrances or alcohols that can be irritating for sensitive skin. It may also help to look for sunscreen that only uses physical blockers such as titanium dioxide or zinc oxide instead of sunscreen that uses chemical blockers such as oxybenzone, octocrylene, octinoxate, etc. The physical blockers have less risk of irritating the skin.

3) Your makeup might already have an SPF.
For women, tinted moisturizers, foundations and powders commonly include a Sun Protection Factor (SPF). Double-check the label of your daily makeup to see if you are using makeup that includes an SPF of 15 or higher. Unless you typically use a thick layer of make-up, you would still need to use a sunscreen as well. Don’t just rely on your make-up. For the face, look for face moisturizers with sunscreen already in them. These sunscreens usually do not have the typical sunscreen smell and may feel nicer on your skin. Don’t forget to also put sunscreen on your neck and upper chest. Put this on in the morning after you wash your face every day to protect your skin.

Please re-apply sunscreen every 3-4 hours if you are going to be continuously outdoors, get wet or are perspiring.

4) Check for an SPF between 30 and 50 for every day use
Look for an SPF of 30 or higher. SPF 15 filters out 93 percent of rays, SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent and SPF 50 blocks 98 percent. No sunscreen can block 100 percent. For daily use, a sunscreen of at least SPF 30 is recommended. If you will be outdoors for a long time (swimming, hiking, etc) please wear a higher SPF.

5) Decide between cream and spray—or use both!
They each are handy in different situations. You may prefer a cream for yourself, but when applying to children, a spray may be easier. Sprays are also convenient for protecting areas that are hard to apply a cream sunscreen to such as the scalp, back or top of the foot. If you do use a spray, be careful around open flames as some sprays include alcohol and may be flammable.

Whatever sunscreen you choose, the best way to protect your skin from sun damage is to be mindful of exposure. Limit time in the sun, apply sunscreen before you go out and reapply every two hours. You can also consider sun protective clothing or wide-brimmed hats.

Besides sun protection, another excellent health strategy is to schedule a dermatology skin screening. They’re fast, easy and can detect skin irregularities early.

Enjoy the sun this summer (but not too much)!


 

Healthy Habits for Summer

It’s early June, but it already feels like summer is HERE. With the warmer weather, and flowers in bloom, try to think of this as a time for you to create healthy changes!

So we’ve put together a few ideas to get ready for summer sun, the beach and feeling great.

Drink water.
If you ever feel slightly tired or sluggish, it’s always a good idea to consider how much water you’ve drank lately. Even if you make great choices in every other aspect of your health, if you neglect water intake, your body may not feel tip top.

The old one-size-fits-all rule was to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. However, the new thinking is that you should drink half your body weight in ounces per day to stay adequately hydrated. (So if you weigh 150 pounds, you would drink 75 ounces of water each day—or about nine glasses.) Doing some rigorous exercise? Increase your water intake. A reusable water bottle by your side can be a great reminder to sip water.

Get some exercise.
Exercise alone doesn’t promote weight loss, but it’s a key component to a fit body. Setting goals and doing physical activities you enjoy is a good start. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends adults get at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week, plus muscle-strengthening activities on at least two days.

That might sound like a lot, but when broken out over seven days, you could exercise just 30 minutes on five days. If you are pressed for time, it’s also OK to split up your daily exercise goal into 10-minute chunks. Easy muscle-strengthening ideas include push-ups, squats and sit-ups. Still no time? Doing 15 of each a day is better than nothing and only takes about 5 minutes.

Even if you fall short, aim to have no days with zero activity. Even a short walk is better than a completely sedentary day.

Eat your way to a healthy body.
Being unprepared makes it all too easy to eat foods close at hand rather than healthy foods. A little planning, shopping and chopping will help you lose or maintain a healthy weight and move you toward a healthier diet. Chop vegetables in advance and store in the refrigerator or freezer. Plan and bring healthy snacks for work that keep you well away from the vending machine.

Use the MyPlate method to design meals. The four quarters of your plate should be divided between fruits, vegetables, protein and grains.

Easy "wins" for your eating plan might be choosing a black-bean burger over regular beef or skipping the cheese on a salad or sandwich. If you enjoy salads, be mindful of the dressing. Heavy, creamy options like ranch or blue cheese can be swapped for a balsamic or Italian vinaigrette. On their own these changes seem small, but weekly they add up to big potential weight loss.

Another tip—Try to avoid extra calories from sugary beverages, such as sodas and juices. Read the labels—sometimes even beverages that are labeled as healthy can contain a lot of sugar! Rather, make your own smoothies, containing healthy vegetables, fruits (maybe frozen) and plain yogurt.

Sleep well.
A lack of sleep increases the levels of a hunger hormone called ghrelin and decreases levels of the satiety/fullness hormone called leptin. So not enough sleep could lead to overeating and weight gain. When you get 7-9 hours of quality sleep, your body feels more balanced and that will help you to snack less, make better food choices and have fewer cravings. What else does a lack of sleep do? It makes you crave more carbs!

Four sleep culprits:

  • Smartphone use. Lying in bed with the blue light from your smartphone screen stimulates the brain and may slow the release of the sleep-inducing hormone called melatonin. The result? It’s difficult to fall asleep! Even though many phones now have a “night mode” feature to filter out blue light, the act of engaging with your phone right before bed may still be disruptive to your sleep.
  • Stimulants like coffee, alcohol and food— alcohol especially, because it can make you snore and wakes you.
  • An environment that’s either too hot or too cold.
  • And lastly, a no-brainer—stress.

Be mindful, reduce stress.
Try adding meditation practice into your daily routine. It’s easy to get lost each day rushing from one thing to another, particularly when kids are home from school, and vacation-planning can add to already existing stress levels. Try to take 5 minutes each day to practice gratitude. Research done on this topic has shown that reminding ourselves to be grateful, for not only what is good, but also some of our struggles that help us grow, reduces the stress response in our bodies, and regulates our sleep and mood.

Listen to your body!
Overall, the best way to improve your health and feel good about yourself before summer is to take some time to listen to your body. Treat it well and you’ll be on the path to feeling great in time for summer!


 

To-Go Baked Oatmeal

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • ¼ cup canola or olive oil
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • ½ cup applesauce
  • 1½ cups non-dairy or cow milk
  • 2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon
  • 3 cups old fashioned rolled oats
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • Optional: your favorite toppings (fruit, nuts, chocolate chips, etc.)

Instructions:

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a muffin tin with paper or paper/foil muffin liners.
  • In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, oil, and brown sugar until sugar is dissolved. Add the applesauce, milk, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon. Whisk until well combined. Stir in the oats and baking powder.
  • Fill the muffin tin with ¼ cup of the oat mixture in each muffin cup. Add your favorite toppings. Push the toppings down into the oat mixture with a spoon.
  • Bake for 30 minutes. Let them cool for 5 minutes before eating. Store in an airtight container or freeze in a zip top storage bag.

Recipe courtesy of: The Wholesome Dish


 

Attend a free women’s health event

We invite you to our upcoming educational seminars to discuss common female health concerns:

  • Creating a Better Work-Life Balance
  • How Do I Prevent Osteoporosis?
  • Investing in Your Health: Changing Your Weight By Changing Your Life

Saturday, June 18, at our Renton clinic
9-11am (8:30 registration)
601 S Carr Rd, Suite 100, Renton, WA 98055

Saturday, June 25, at our Canyon Park clinic
9-11am (8:30 registration)
1909 214th St SE, Suite 300, Bothell, WA 98021

Click here for more information.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Don’t have time to workout? Try HIIT Workouts.

Finding enough time to workout is a challenge for many men. Getting up early or squeezing exercise in after work is a difficult habit to build. Finding a workout that fits your schedule and you enjoy and that delivers maximum benefits? That’s the goal for many people.

One of the top trends in the fitness world today is high-intensity interval training, or HIIT. These workout programs feature short intervals of high intensity followed by longer rest periods. This approach gives maximum physical benefits in a short amount of time.

If you’re pressed for time and seeking a quick workout that still generates benefits and gets you sweating, HIIT can be a great option.

What is HIIT?
High-intensity interval training is a method of exercise that alternates quick, high-intensity intervals with longer, slower intervals for recovery. The goal is to perform short bursts of all-out work (typically about 30 seconds) that pushes your body near its limit. This is followed by periods of less intense activity to recover, typically about 1 minute. Together, these intervals have been shown to make the body work harder than performing a cardio exercise at a constant level for an equal amount of time.

Why do a HIIT workout?

  • A HIIT workout increases overall physical fitness. Pushing yourself during the intense part of the interval increases endurance and stamina. You may notice a difference during other workouts and daily life.
  • Even after a HIIT training, your body continues to burn calories. A HIIT training’s intensity means your body has to work harder to get back into balance after exerting itself. So even when you’re resting after your workout, your body continues to burn calories.
  • The workout is short—a great benefit if your schedule is packed. A quick HIIT workout of 10 minutes has many benefits. If you have more time, shoot for a 15-20 HIIT session.

How do I start?
Ease into HIIT. If you’re not accustomed to high-intensity exercise, a HIIT workout can be a shock to your body.

A HIIT-style workout can include almost any aerobic exercise—running, cycling, Pilates. Any aerobic activity you enjoy can be turned into a HIIT training session. In general, perform your chosen activity all-out for about 30 seconds and then recover for 1 minute. (For example, sprint for 30 seconds and then walk for 1 minute.) This can be repeated for 15-20 minutes, depending on your fitness level. And don’t forget to warm up for at least 5 minutes before a HIIT session.

HIIT workouts are intense, so it should be just one type of workout you do. Incorporate it maybe once or twice a week to start and allow recovery between sessions.


 

5 Things to Consider When Choosing Sunscreen

Summer is right around the corner, now is a good time take stock of your sun protection from last summer.

Keep these tips in mind to help choose and use an effective sunscreen:

1) Look for the words "broad spectrum" on the label.
The two types of UV light in sunshine than can damage your skin are called UVA and UVB rays. Sunscreen labeled as “broad spectrum” protects against both types of rays. Only sunscreens that protect against both are allowed to advertise the words “broad spectrum” on the label.

2) If you have sensitive skin, study the ingredients.
Some sunscreens include fragrances or alcohols that can be irritating for sensitive skin. It may also help to look for sunscreen that only uses physical blockers such as titanium dioxide or zinc oxide instead of sunscreen that uses chemical blockers such as oxybenzone, octocrylene, octinoxate, etc. The physical blockers have less risk of irritating the skin.

3) Your makeup might already have an SPF.
For women, tinted moisturizers, foundations and powders commonly include a Sun Protection Factor (SPF). Double-check the label of your daily makeup to see if you are using makeup that includes an SPF of 15 or higher. Unless you typically use a thick layer of make-up, you would still need to use a sunscreen as well. Don’t just rely on your make-up. For the face, look for face moisturizers with sunscreen already in them. These sunscreens usually do not have the typical sunscreen smell and may feel nicer on your skin. Don’t forget to also put sunscreen on your neck and upper chest. Put this on in the morning after you wash your face every day to protect your skin.

Please re-apply sunscreen every 3-4 hours if you are going to be continuously outdoors, get wet or are perspiring.

4) Check for an SPF between 30 and 50 for every day use
Look for an SPF of 30 or higher. SPF 15 filters out 93 percent of rays, SPF 30 keeps out 97 percent and SPF 50 blocks 98 percent. No sunscreen can block 100 percent. For daily use, a sunscreen of at least SPF 30 is recommended. If you will be outdoors for a long time (swimming, hiking, etc) please wear a higher SPF.

5) Decide between cream and spray—or use both!
They each are handy in different situations. You may prefer a cream for yourself, but when applying to children, a spray may be easier. Sprays are also convenient for protecting areas that are hard to apply a cream sunscreen to such as the scalp, back or top of the foot. If you do use a spray, be careful around open flames as some sprays include alcohol and may be flammable.

Whatever sunscreen you choose, the best way to protect your skin from sun damage is to be mindful of exposure. Limit time in the sun, apply sunscreen before you go out and reapply every two hours. You can also consider sun protective clothing or wide-brimmed hats.

Besides sun protection, another excellent health strategy is to schedule a dermatology skin screening. They’re fast, easy and can detect skin irregularities early.

Enjoy the sun this summer (but not too much)!


 

Healthy Habits for Summer

It’s early June, but it already feels like summer is HERE. With the warmer weather, and flowers in bloom, try to think of this as a time for you to create healthy changes!

So we’ve put together a few ideas to get ready for summer sun, the beach and feeling great.

Drink water.
If you ever feel slightly tired or sluggish, it’s always a good idea to consider how much water you’ve drank lately. Even if you make great choices in every other aspect of your health, if you neglect water intake, your body may not feel tip top.

The old one-size-fits-all rule was to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. However, the new thinking is that you should drink half your body weight in ounces per day to stay adequately hydrated. (So if you weigh 150 pounds, you would drink 75 ounces of water each day—or about nine glasses.) Doing some rigorous exercise? Increase your water intake. A reusable water bottle by your side can be a great reminder to sip water.

Get some exercise.
Exercise alone doesn’t promote weight loss, but it’s a key component to a fit body. Setting goals and doing physical activities you enjoy is a good start. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends adults get at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week, plus muscle-strengthening activities on at least two days.

That might sound like a lot, but when broken out over seven days, you could exercise just 30 minutes on five days. If you are pressed for time, it’s also OK to split up your daily exercise goal into 10-minute chunks. Easy muscle-strengthening ideas include push-ups, squats and sit-ups. Still no time? Doing 15 of each a day is better than nothing and only takes about 5 minutes.

Even if you fall short, aim to have no days with zero activity. Even a short walk is better than a completely sedentary day.

Eat your way to a healthy body.
Being unprepared makes it all too easy to eat foods close at hand rather than healthy foods. A little planning, shopping and chopping will help you lose or maintain a healthy weight and move you toward a healthier diet. Chop vegetables in advance and store in the refrigerator or freezer. Plan and bring healthy snacks for work that keep you well away from the vending machine.

Use the MyPlate method to design meals. The four quarters of your plate should be divided between fruits, vegetables, protein and grains.

Easy "wins" for your eating plan might be choosing a black-bean burger over regular beef or skipping the cheese on a salad or sandwich. If you enjoy salads, be mindful of the dressing. Heavy, creamy options like ranch or blue cheese can be swapped for a balsamic or Italian vinaigrette. On their own these changes seem small, but weekly they add up to big potential weight loss.

Another tip—Try to avoid extra calories from sugary beverages, such as sodas and juices. Read the labels—sometimes even beverages that are labeled as healthy can contain a lot of sugar! Rather, make your own smoothies, containing healthy vegetables, fruits (maybe frozen) and plain yogurt.

Sleep well.
A lack of sleep increases the levels of a hunger hormone called ghrelin and decreases levels of the satiety/fullness hormone called leptin. So not enough sleep could lead to overeating and weight gain. When you get 7-9 hours of quality sleep, your body feels more balanced and that will help you to snack less, make better food choices and have fewer cravings. What else does a lack of sleep do? It makes you crave more carbs!

Four sleep culprits:

  • Smartphone use. Lying in bed with the blue light from your smartphone screen stimulates the brain and may slow the release of the sleep-inducing hormone called melatonin. The result? It’s difficult to fall asleep! Even though many phones now have a “night mode” feature to filter out blue light, the act of engaging with your phone right before bed may still be disruptive to your sleep.
  • Stimulants like coffee, alcohol and food— alcohol especially, because it can make you snore and wakes you.
  • An environment that’s either too hot or too cold.
  • And lastly, a no-brainer—stress.

Be mindful, reduce stress.
Try adding meditation practice into your daily routine. It’s easy to get lost each day rushing from one thing to another, particularly when kids are home from school, and vacation-planning can add to already existing stress levels. Try to take 5 minutes each day to practice gratitude. Research done on this topic has shown that reminding ourselves to be grateful, for not only what is good, but also some of our struggles that help us grow, reduces the stress response in our bodies, and regulates our sleep and mood.

Listen to your body!
Overall, the best way to improve your health and feel good about yourself before summer is to take some time to listen to your body. Treat it well and you’ll be on the path to feeling great in time for summer!


 

Peanut Butter Protein Smoothie

For a simple, protein-packed meal, try this peanut butter smoothie!

Preparation time: 5 minutes | Servings: 1

Peanut Butter Protein Smoothie Ingredients:

  • 1 banana, peeled and sliced and then frozen
  • 2-3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (I like the Dutch Processed kind)
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • ½ cup plain or vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon sweetener (honey or maple syrup) optional
  • ½ to ¾ cup milk (almond or cow's milk both work well)

Instructions:
Add everything to your blender and blend until smooth. Add more milk as needed to process until smooth. Enjoy right away.

Recipe courtesy of: Bless this Mess

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Flu season typically starts in the fall. Although it's not flu season now, we've put together some frequently asked questions about the flu and the flu vaccine. Please check back regularly for more information!

For a list of our flu shot clinics, follow this link.


I’m healthy. So do I really need a flu vaccine?
Influenza (flu) is a contagious disease that affects the lungs and can lead to serious illness, including pneumonia. Even healthy people who get the flu can be sick enough to miss work or school for a significant amount of time. They can even be hospitalized. The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older.

Some people have a greater risk of serious complications from the flu, and getting a yearly flu vaccine is especially important for them. This includes pregnant women, young children and older people. It also includes people with certain chronic medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and heart disease.

For a complete list of who needs the flu shot, follow this link: www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/whoshouldvax.htm

Is the flu vaccine safe?
Yes. The flu vaccine is safe. Flu vaccines have been given to hundreds of millions of people for more than 50 years and have a very good safety record. Each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) works closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other partners to ensure the highest safety standards for flu vaccines.

Talk with your health-care provider or pharmacist about which flu vaccine is recommended for you.

When should I see a doctor?
Typical flu symptoms usually do not require medical attention. But if you are a healthy adult and are not at risk for complications, you should contact your doctor if you have unexplained fever and trouble breathing, or if your symptoms are getting worse.

People with some conditions are at high risk for complications if they get the flu. See a list of who is at higher risk here: www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm.

If you are at risk for severe influenza or complications of influenza, you should contact your doctor if you:

  • develop symptoms of the flu, including fever and either a cough or sore throat—OR—
  • have had close contact with someone who is definitely known to have influenza.

Note: Call your doctor rather than visit. Unless you need urgent medical care, please call rather than visit your doctor’s office, clinic or hospital. Your health care provider will determine over the phone whether influenza testing or treatment is needed.

If I have the flu, how long must I stay home?
If you are sick, you should stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever has passed (without the use of fever-reducing medicine). You should avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from infecting others. Some people are at risk of serious complications from the flu.

How long does a flu vaccine work?
The flu vaccine will protect you for one flu season.

How is the flu spread from one person to another?
People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away. Most experts think that flu viruses are spread mainly by droplets made when a sick person coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can enter the mouths or noses of people who are nearby, or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Less often, a person also might get the flu by touching a surface or object (a door knob, countertop, shopping cart, etc.) that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth or nose.

People with flu can infect others beginning one day before symptoms start and up to seven or more days after becoming sick. Although it is possible to pass the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, most flu cases result from a person who has symptoms passing the virus to another person. Children, especially younger children, might be contagious for longer periods. Learn more here: www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm.

How can I avoid getting the flu?

  • The best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each year.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand lotion.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

How can I avoid spreading the flu?

  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • If you or your child gets sick with flu-like illness, the CDC recommends that you (or your child) stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone, except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.
  • If an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs, follow public health advice. This may include information about how to increase distance between people and other measures.

For the latest information about the flu, visit the CDC’s flu web pages: www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/index.htm.

More links:

This message was created using information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Public Health – Seattle & King County (PHSKC) websites.

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Welcome!

 

We are glad you’ve chosen PacMed.
At PacMed, you’ll find a special, caring environment—a place where it’s easy to get the care you need. And you’ll have a primary care provider who will build a long-term, healing relationship with you.

We have a wealth of health resources to share, including a library of health articles written by PacMed doctors, healthy recipes and links to other reliable health information sources.

The best path to good health is knowledge. Please tell us more about your interests below!


Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Health Resources

We believe good information is powerful medicine. That’s why we’re pleased to offer the following guidance on preventive care and health maintenance. We encourage you to look it over. You’ll see how making smart decisions each day can add up to a lifetime of good health.

Making Healthy Choices for a Better Quality of Life

We believe that good information is powerful medicine. That’s why we’re pleased to offer the following guidance on preventive care and health maintenance. We encourage you to look it over. You’ll see how making smart decisions each day can add up to a lifetime of good health.

Have specific health topics you want to brush up on? Check out our information on “Checkups and Vaccines,” or visit the “Preventive Care” page for quick tips and suggestions on topics like aspirin use, nutrition and determining your body mass index (BMI).

Looking for more in-depth discussions? See what our doctors are sharing in their “Healthy Every Day” articles. You’ll find practical advice on child-rearing concerns, getting and staying healthy and other topics.

Want to dig deeper? Take advantage of the “Health Links” page, which offers links to outside resources on topics like travel medicine, gastroenterology or dermatology.

Lose our newsletter? Editions of our “Healthy Today” newsletter are available here.

If you would like more information or wish to make an appointment for a checkup, please call your local Pacific Medical Center or 1.888.4PACMED. We look forward to sharing a long and healthy relationship with you.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Immunizations and screenings are easy to forget, yet they are a vital part of leading a healthy life. Use this list of important steps to keep on top of your health. Be happy. Stay healthy.

Women

Cervical Cancer Screening (Pap Smear): Every 3 years for women age 21-29 and every 5 years for women age 30-64. (May differ depending on your situation; consult your provider.)

Breast Cancer Screening: Mammograms yearly or every other year, beginning at age 40 or 50. (Consult your provider.)

Osteoporosis Screening: DXA scan once after age 65 or if high risk. (Consult your provider.)

Men

Prostate Cancer Screening: Discuss with your provider.

Abdominal Aneurysm Screening: Ultrasound once between ages 65 and 75 if a history of smoking.

Women and Men

Colon Cancer Screening: Preferred method—Colonoscopy every 10 years, beginning at age 50. Other acceptable methods—Fecal occult blood test every year AND flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years.

Cholesterol Testing: Beginning at age 20, every 1-5 years.

Diabetes Screening: Beginning at age 45, every 3 years. (Consult your provider.)

Immunizations:

  • Substitute Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) one time for adults, then tetanus and diphtheria (Td) booster every 10 years.
  • Flu shot every year.
  • Zoster (shingles) vaccine once at age 60 or above.
  • Pneumococcal (Pneumovax) vaccine at age 65 (earlier if recommended by your provider).

You can download our Health Maintenance Guidelines here:

  Health Maintenance Guidelines for Children and Adults



Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Sign up here to receive our Healthy Today newsletter and Health Tips emails. They are full of great articles, recipes and health tips. You can check out the latest issue here.

Just tell us your name and email address and we'll sign you up for our Healthy Today newsletter online. If you prefer a paper copy, be sure to include your mailing address.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed
 
Everyday recipes button Healthy snacks button Holiday recipes button

This selection of recipes has been recommended by our dietitians, who want to help you make the best eating choices you can. We hope you will enjoy this resource and find some new favorites to add to your repertoire of meals and snacks. We will continue to add to this collection, so visit this page, www.PacMed.org/recipes, to explore new and wholesome ideas for you and your family.

If you have questions about nutrition or your health, we invite you to make an appointment with your doctor or a PacMed provider. To talk with a PacMed representative, call 1.888.4PACMED (888-472-2633).

More healthy resources for you and your family:

Sign up for Healthy Tips button

Our Latest Recipe

Click the image below for a downloadable pdf.


 

Eight No-Fuss Healthy Snacks


Convenience is one reason why kids and adults are more likely to reach for a bag of chips or a high-fat microwaveable snack. Try some of these healthier no-fuss alternatives instead to curb afternoon hunger pangs:


  • Individual serving of fat-free yogurt or sugar-free pudding
  • Microwaveable popcorn (a whole bag of 94 percent fat-free“butter-flavored” popcorn has less than 150 calories)
  • Low-fat string cheese and a handful of cherry tomatoes
  • Sliced apple with a tablespoon of peanut butter
  • Banana
  • A dozen baby carrots with hummus dip
  • Cup of homemade trail mix with whole grain cereal, raisins and dry-roasted peanuts or almonds, or a cup of cereal with non-fat milk
  • Whole wheat tortilla wrap with low-fat cheese (microwave just long enough to melt cheese)
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Welcome to PacMed.

For a same-day appointment call 1.877.722.6330, Monday-Friday, 7:30am-5:00pm.

Or, make a convenient online appointment now.


Click here to view pediatricians at PacMed. Our family medicine providers are also available at nine clinic locations to care for your whole family.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Which of these is not a healthy diabetes-prevention strategy?

Super-sizing your lunch

When creating a healthy lifestyle that minimizes your risk for diabetes, super-sizing your meals isn’t a smart option. The best strategy is to choose a meal that is full of useful nutrients and offers something from all of the important food groups.

Some other tips for fighting diabetes include eating the same amount of food at each meal, eating meals at about the same times every day and eating smaller meals (including 1–3 snacks) daily. If you have the option, always choose whole grains, whole vegetables and fruits instead of processed, convenience foods such as breakfast cereals, chips, canned soups and prepackaged dinners.

Choose My Plate

Want to learn more about preventing diabetes? Visit PacMed’s diabetes health resources page to gain all the information you need to fight this disease.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

How many people in the US have prediabetes?

1 in 4

One in four Americans has prediabetes. That’s approximately 79 million people. Having prediabetes means your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.

People with prediabetes have a risk of cardiovascular disease that’s 1.5 times greater than people with normal blood glucose levels. Prediabetics have other health risks and complications, too.

Who is at risk to develop pre-diabetes?

  • Have parents, siblings or grandparents with type 2 diabetes
  • Over age 45
  • Race/ethnicity: Native American, Black/African American, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific Islander
  • Overweight
  • Women who have given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more

If you are overweight and 45 or older, you should consider getting checked for prediabetes during your next routine medical appointment. Or if you are particularly concerned, schedule an appointment with one of PacMed’s diabetes specialists today to learn how to control and prevent prediabetes.

Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

PacMed is pleased to share these articles written by our providers. Because we believe your health is the most important investment you can make, we want to share these published articles as a source of trustworthy information to help you stay healthy, every day.

Find your best life!

Topics


Diabetes

Detecting Diabetes: How to Look for, Prevent and Maintain This Rapidly Growing Disease
"Diabetes is on the rise, and it is important to know the biology, causes, and prevention methods of diabetes." Read more

Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes: A Distinct Form of Diabetes
"Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a form of diabetes that is common in people with cystic fibrosis." Read more

Diabetes: Find and Treat it Early for Lifelong Health
"Today, nearly 29.1 million Americans live with diabetes, including almost 1 in 10 people in Washington state. Of those, 8 million don’t even know they have it." Read more

Diabetic Foot Care
"One out of four people with diabetes will have at least one foot ulcer in their lifetime." Read more

Exercising Diabetes Away
"There are 20.8 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes and if Dr. Sonja Maddox had her way they would all be doing one thing..." Read more

Hope for Diabetics: Preventing and Reversing the Disease
"Dr. Estelle Lin provides suggestions on how simple lifestyle changes can prevent or even reverse diabetes..." Read more

How You Can Halt the Diabetes Epidemic
"Researchers are predicting a dramatic increase in diabetes over the next 40 years." Read more


Get Healthy - Stay Healthy

Seattle’s heat wave, wildfire haze could linger into next week, weather service says
"The haze from Canada’s nearly two dozen active wildfires is hanging around Washington state, doing its thing: acting like a blanket between the Earth and the sun, keeping it a bit cooler during the day and a bit warmer during the night....." Read more

Mental Matters, Part 1
"The mind is a complex and cavernous place, and its health fuels emotional stability and clarity. Unfortunately, mental health is sometimes overlooked, pushed into the shadows by its physical counterpart...." Read more

Annual Checkups Deliver Value to Women
"Women are natural jugglers. With careers or school, spouses, children, and maybe a vacation or hobby, they still run circles around the Cirque de Soleil..." Read more

Are You Ready for Cold and Flu Season?
"Every parent dreads their child getting sick; it means missing work and school and, more drastically, requiring a visit to the doctor. Prevention can minimize the risks." Read more

Benefits of Family Medicine
"When selecting a provider as their primary care physician, many people are baffled by one of their options: a family medicine physician." Read more

Building a Balanced Bod
"Is your body ready for summer fun? Some simple resistance training can increase your strength and improve your balance." Read more

A Caregiver’s Guide to Staying Happy
"Whether you’re caring for a spouse, a child, an aging parent, a sick friend or a teenager with a broken leg, you may find your stress level is on the rise." Read more

Changing Your Weight by Changing Your Life
"If Dr. Aileen Monponbanua, of Pacific Medical Center in Renton, has three pieces of advice for those who are overweight or obese and are thinking about losing weight it's this..." Read more

Choosing the Right Pain Medication
"It’s easy to get caught up in the moment and play just one more round of golf, add a few extra miles on your weekend run or make the decision to climb to the next peak on the hiking trail." Read more

Cloudy Days Ahead - Better Grab Your Sunscreen
"Early spring in the Puget Sound region is known for numerous cloudy and rainy days. While everyone knows that a hot, sunny, summer day can cause sunburns, many do not realize that 80 percent of the sun’s harmful rays penetrate through clouds and rain." Read more

Concussions: What We Need to Know to Protect Kids and Adults Alike
"Now that football season is in full swing, the conversation about head injuries and sports is on many people’s minds." Read more

Controlling Allergies in Spring and Early Summer
"Springtime brings sunshine, green grass, chirping birds, blooming bulbs and if you’re unfortunate enough to be a member of the sniffling, sneezing and itching community, then it’s time to carry your tissues." Read more

Cycling Safety
"While many associate Seattle with coffee, rain or seafood, many Seattleites see the relationship between the city and cycling to be stronger." Read more

Dietary Guidelines - A Dietitian's Take
"The 2015 US Dietary Guidelines play a large role in our day to day diets. Learn what the professionals think of the new Guidelines." Read more

E-Cigarettes Too E-Z to be True
"Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have become increasingly popular over the past few years." Read more

E-Cigarettes, Vaping and Your Health From a Doctor's Perspective
"Earlier this year, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized regulations governing the sale and production of what it calls electronic nicotine delivery systems." Read more

Family Planning
"Whether you're looking to postpone having a baby or are considering a permanent solution, there are multiple birth-control options from which to choose." Read more

Feeling Stressed? 6 Ways to Slow Down and Tune in to Your Body
"When you feel stressed, your body is giving you extra energy, allowing you to deal with a perceived challenge." Read more

Fight Workday and Commuter Stress
"Everyone experiences stress to some degree in their everyday lives, whether at work, or commuting in terrible Puget Sound traffic." Read more

Find the Right Primary Care Doctor for You
"Everyone needs a primary care doctor.... Which type of doctor best suits you and your family?" Read more

Gloomy Skies Can Bring Shortage of Vitamin D
"It’s no secret that winter is one of the gloomiest times of the year in Seattle, with short days and little sunlight." Read more

Grilling Tips for Maximum Health and Flavor
"It’s that time of year when the canvas covers start to come off, and like great waking beasts, the grills open their metal jaws and wait for delicacies to be placed within." Read more

Have a Healthy Thanksgiving
"We all look forward to the holidays, getting together with family and friends, and gathering around the table for a great meal. But with the holidays also comes the tendency to throw your normal diet out the window." Read more

Helping the Military to Cope with Workplace Stress
"Every job has its own share of stressors. Among the healthy themes of accomplishment, motivation and teamwork, stress rears its ugly head in many forms in the workplace from time to time." Read more

How to Enjoy Your Holiday Treats Without Gaining Weight
"The holiday season can cause even the most disciplined among us to lose sight of our health and fitness goals." Read more

How (and Why) to Keep Your Kids Away From Screen Time This Summer
"More time parked in front of a screen means less time for playing, or reading, or being with people, or learning. It's not just harmless fun." Read more

How to Manage Holiday Stress
"The holiday season is in full swing, with its usual round of social obligations, gift-giving, cooking and decorating..." Read more

How to Stay Healthy on a Road Trip
"Memorial Day weekend and summertime are just around the corner, which inspires many Seattleites to hit the road for a glorious local getaway." Read more

How Well Do You Know Your Vitamins?
"The Center for Disease Control (CDC) currently recommends eating nine servings of fruits and vegetables every day. On average however, we are usually eating closer to two servings per day."
Read more

How Women Can Keep Their Hearts Healthy
"February is Heart Health Awareness Month, so it’s the perfect time to address the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in women and discuss ways to decrease risk for the development of the disease." Read more

Immunizations: They're Not Just for Kids
"While parents generally are careful to keep their children up-to-date on immunizations, many are not as meticulous about getting themselves vaccinated..." Read more

Invest in Your Health
"Everyone's looking for ways to protect their money these days, so here's a hot tip: Stay healthy." Read more

Is it a Cold or the Flu?
"It's important to know whether you have a cold or the flu to treat it properly." Read more

It’s February — Do You Know Where Your Resolutions Are?
"At the beginning of the year, many of us make New Year’s resolutions...But a month into the New Year most people find that their motivation has started to wane." Read more

Keep Your Heart Healthy This Valentine's Day
"Dr. Bobbie Paramsothy shares some myths, tips and preventive measures that can help you show your heart a little love this February." Read more

Keeping Student Athletes Healthy
"As spring sports season ramps up around Seattle, it’s important to ensure student athletes are getting proper nutrition." Read more

Kids and e-Cigarettes and Vapes
"Here’s what you should know about kids and e-cigarettes and vapes, from new regulations to helping them quit. Read more

Making Goals, Keeping Track
"Fitness trackers are flooding the markets these days. Some are devices you wear, others are websites." Read more

Managing Holiday Stress
"Each year, the holiday season seems to start earlier and earlier." Read more

Tips on Minimizing Stress During the Holidays
"Sometimes just the stress of the holiday season can be overwhelming. Here are a few tips on how to minimize stress." Read more

The Paleo Diet: Is It Right for You?
"The Paleo diet has gained explosive popularity over the past year. Enthusiasts praise the diet for its supposed ability to increase energy, support weight loss and improve sleep." Read more

Tips on Staying Healthy During Flu Season
"As flu season approaches, here's how to stay healthy and what to do if you’ve come down with a cold." Read more

Managing Wedding Planning Stress
"Summer is just around the corner and so is wedding season." Read more

Preparing for Your Doctor's Visit
"'I don't get to spend enough time with my doctor' is a common concern for many patients." Read more

Prevent Injury this Ski Season
"With winter fast upon us and snow falling in the mountains, here are some facts I tell my patients about common skiing and snowboarding injuries..." Read more

Preventing Injuries While Training
"Tired of getting hurt during military training? One local sports medicine doc has some tips." Read more

Prevention: Tips to Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle
"Prevention is a key component in reducing healthcare costs and lowering your risks for chronic illness. Even more importantly..." Read more

Ramp Up Slowly — Your 2016 Fitness Guide
"It’s the new year, and for many, that means it’s the time they reassess their wellness goals." Read more

Road-Tripping Tips for Health-Conscious Travelers
"Nothing says summertime like grabbing a few friends, loading up the car and hitting the open road." Read more

Setting and Keeping Resolutions
"As women, we are accustomed to our plate being always full. With our family, our job, our friends and neighbors, and our broader community, it is hard to carve out a few minutes each day for ourselves, let alone focus on yet another obligation, goal or dreaded New Year's resolution." Read more

Six Ways to Keep Your Kids Safe and Healthy on Summer Trips
"School is out, and lots of families are heading out of town. The last thing people want to deal with once they have time off from work and school is illness or an injury." Read more

Sleep Deprivation
"Sleeping soundly? Sleep deprivation is no joke; with consequences relative to both personal health and work performance, the issue of not getting enough sleep is one that should be taken seriously." Read more

Spinning Your Wheels? Bike Safety
"Before you head out and hit the bike trails, take some steps to make sure you and your bike are ready for an excellent, safe summer season." Read more

Spring Break Safety
"Here are some tips to make this year’s spring vacation fun, safe and healthy for yourself, your friends and your family." Read more

Staying Healthy During the Dark Days of Winter
"While the shortest day of the year may be behind us, there is still plenty of winter left for us in Seattle — this means short, cool and often gloomy days with little sunlight." Read more

Take Charge—Own Your Shape!
"Eating well, feeling good about yourself, fitting into your favorite dress—these are all signs of good physical health, self-confidence and a sense of empowerment." Read more

Take Advantage of Autumn to Get Healthy
"Fall is a time of shorter days, crisp air and leaves bursting with color. It can be melancholic, with winter approaching and summer over." Read more

Take Note of Your Skin Spots
"As Seattleites take to the beach, the mountains or the happy hour patio tables, it’s a critical time to remind everyone about sun protection and the risk of skin cancer." Read more

Test Your Healthy Holiday Meal IQ
"The holidays are quickly approaching and with this season comes some delicious food traditions including holiday parties, cookie exchanges, family meals and homemade treats." Read more

Tips for Beating Spring Allergies
"Seasonal allergies can sometimes put a damper on the season, but you can mitigate allergens with over-the-counter medications.” Read more

Tips for Getting a Good Night’s Sleep
"Colleges and schools around Seattle are back in session now, and as schedules become increasingly busy, getting enough sleep is critical." Read more

Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating
"From the Macy’s holiday parade to the Westlake Center tree lighting and the annual Gingerbread Village at the Seattle Sheraton, holiday activities are quickly approaching." Read more

Tips for International Travel
"Exploring the world around us is exciting and educational. But nothing spoils a trip like getting sick." Read more

Tips for Staying Hydrated at Summertime Events
"The record-breaking summer temperatures have Seattleites braced with a variety of coping mechanisms." Read more

Undiagnosed Heart Conditions
"February is American Heart Month, and while many people will talk about heart disease and stroke, there are other heart conditions that people may not even know they have." Read more

Vitamins for Preventive Health
"Our weather in the Pacific Northwest is filled with rainy and cloud-stricken days, making vitamin deficiency a hot topic at local primary care clinics, especially during the winter months." Read more

Walk Your Way to Health
"Now might be a good time to begin a walking program to shed that extra weight." Read more

What You Need to Know About Flu Shots
"Flu season is here, and now is the best time to get your flu shot." Read more

When it Comes to Breast Cancer, Ask the Right Questions
"About 1 in 8 women will develop invasive breast cancer. This year alone, an estimated 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S." Read more

When it Comes to Breast Cancer, Know Your Risks
"Know your personal risk factors so you can reduce your risk of breast cancer through lifestyle changes and screening that is tailored to your individual situation. " Read more

Why Get a Checkup?
"What can I do to make sure that I am as healthy as I can be?" Read more

Work-Life Balance – 5 Tips to Restore Harmony
"It’s hard to believe we’re half way through the fall season and the holidays are just around the corner." Read more

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Pediatrics

Asthma in Children
"Whether your child is 15 months or 6 years old, it is still a very scary day when you first realize that they are wheezing and working hard just to breathe." Read more

Avoid the September Shock: Prepare Now for Back-to-School
"Where has summer gone? Didn’t the final school bell ring just last week? Before you know it, September will be upon us and school will be in full swing." Read more

Babywearing Benefits
"Using a baby carrier leaves your hands free and makes for happier, healthier babies." Read more

Bed-Wetting
"Soggy sheets and pajamas—and an embarrassed child—are a familiar experience for many parents. But don't despair." Read more

Bullying Doesn't Take a Summer Break
"Although school is out for summer recess, bullying can still occur." Read more

Closing the Door on Childhood Obesity
"The rate of childhood obesity is alarmingly high..." Read more

Countering Childhood Obesity with Healthy Habits
"As Americans, we are proud to be first in so many things. Unfortunately, we are also first in something that shouldn't make us proud—childhood obesity." Read more

Creating a Healthy Lifestyle for Your Family
"Many parents ask me for advice on how to keep their children healthy. For most parents and kids, hearing "diet and exercise" is not only intimidating but also overwhelming." Read more

Deciding About a Circumcision for Your Newborn Son
"If you and your family are undecided on the best choice for your newborn son, this article provides some basic information." Read more

Does My Child Get Enough Vitamin D?
"Living and working in the Pacific Northwest, we often hear questions about vitamin D, especially during the long dark winters." Read more

Good Nutrition and Your Child
"One of the most frequent questions I am asked is, 'Is my child eating enough?'" Read more

Great Ideas to Keep Your Kids Active
"Maybe recess is too short at your child's school. Or maybe sports teams aren't offered at school. Whatever the reason, a child with unspent energy requires creative solutions!" Read more

Healthy Start to the New School Year
"I can’t tell you how many kids come in with anxieties about how they’re fitting in or whether they’re going to have any friends." Read more

Help Your Kids Develop Safe Screen Habits
"Do you ever feel like your kids (and you) are spending too much time with electronic devices? Medical experts recommend that parents limit their children’s screen time." Read more

Home Safety and Your Child
"Safety: it's parents' number-one concern for their children. We all want our kids to be safe, healthy and happy." Read more

How to Help Kids (and You) Make Sense of School Lockdown Drills
"By law, every school in Washington needs to be prepared. But what do you say when your child is practicing for something unthinkable?" Read more

Is My Son Depressed, or Just Lazy?
"A mother will express concern that her son has been withdrawn, holed up in his room, eyes glued to his Xbox. He seems more irritable." Read more

Keeping Your Kids Active This Winter
"Winter is here! And with winter come cold, rainy, dark days. What is a parent to do with kids who have a lot of unspent energy?" Read more

Keeping Your Kids Healthy During Cold and Flu Season
"Labor Day has come and gone, the kids are back in school ... cold and flu season are lurking just around the corner." Read more

Kid's Safety on Halloween
"Halloween is a lot of fun, but it is also a lot riskier than other days of the year, too." Read more

Let's Get Healthy - Recommendations for Healthy Eating and Living
"Parents, did you know that over 30 percent of America's school-age youngsters are now overweight?" Read more

Outdoor Safety Tips for Your Children
"With the start of another beautiful Seattle spring and the promise of warmer weather to come, now is a great time to review outdoor safety tips with our children." Read more

Safety and Your School-Aged Child
"Did you know that injuries are the leading cause of death for school-aged children?" Read more

School Nutrition
"It may seem like summer just started, but back-to-school is just a couple weeks away. Transitioning back to a school schedule — such as getting back on a regular sleep cycle and doing nightly homework — can take weeks." Read more

Sleeping Tips for Your Family
"Every child is different, but there are certain basic principles that can guide parents in ensuring that their children have sound sleep habits." Read more

Starting Solid Foods—When, What, How?
"I remember having a conversation with my new-mom’s group as our babies were approaching the age of starting solid foods." Read more

Summertime and Your Kids
"Parents, what are you going to do with your kids this summer?" Read more

Ten Icky-Weather Activities for Kids
"Here are some creative ideas for keeping the young people in your life active and entertained this winter!" Read more

Tips When Heading Outdoors with Kids
"With this gorgeous summer weather beckoning everyone in the family outside, it is a good time to review and prepare for any injuries or illness you may encounter in your adventures." Read more

Vaccinating Against HPV
"Kim is a single mom, raising an 11-year-old daughter. She is well educated and wants to make the best decision for her daughter but is confused about the HPV vaccine." Read more

What's for Lunch at School?
"Kids are back at school again, and healthy eating habits in children are important for their well-being, growth and mental development." Read more

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Specialty Topics

5 Tips for Healthy Aging
"If you walk into a room and forget why you’re there, you’re not alone. Likewise, if you find yourself searching for a word that’s on the tip of your tongue, most likely there’s nothing wrong with your brain function. “Those are fairly normal distraction errors,” says Dr. Lisa Olsson, a neuropsychologist with Pacific Medical Centers who focuses on dementia, traumatic brain injury multiple sclerosis and developmental disabilities." Read more

Staying Cool During Back-to-school
"As summer comes to an end, children and parents are hustling to complete last-minute tasks in preparation for the upcoming academic year. In the overwhelming whirlwind of purchasing supplies, completing physicals and reevaluating bedtimes, anxiety about returning to school may settle in for youngsters." Read more

Summer Skin Care Safety
"Summer has finally graced Washington state with its presence, causing people to migrate outside for outdoors galore. Amid the excitement of celebratory BBQs, water park weekends and poolside lounging, it can be easy to neglect proper skin care for summertime. Thankfully, Pacific Medical Centers' dermatologist and U.S. Air Force Reserve senior flight surgeon at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, McChord Field, Matthew R. Gee, MD, FAAD (Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology), is here to offer professional advice to ensure that time spent in the sun is safe and fun." Read more

Here Comes the Sun: Tips from Pacific Medical Centers
"Year-round use of sunscreen products with a sun protection factor (SPF) over 30 can greatly reduce the risk of skin cancers. If you’ll be outdoors all day or exposed to reflective elements like sand, water or snow, consider increasing the SPF and frequency you reapply." Read more

Advance Directives: End of Life on Your Terms
"There are three types of documents that inform others of your decisions for care at the end of your life." Read more

Be Winter-Ready, with Emergency Kits and Food
"...power outages, flooding, a cold house, being snowed in or getting stuck on the roads. All of which leads to one question: are you ready? " Read more

Better Awareness to Prevent Prostate Cancer
"Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men with more than two million men currently living with the disease." Read more

Cataracts, Prevention and Treatment
"Almost everyone knows an older family member or friend who has had cataracts. But what are cataracts?" Read more

Five Topics Women Are Too Embarrassed to Discuss with Their Doctor—but Shouldn’t Be
"Some health topics are embarrassing, so much that women are afraid to talk about them even in the privacy of a doctor’s office." Read more

Glaucoma Can Slowly, Silently Dim Your Vision
"Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness around the globe." Read more

How Strong Are Your Bones?
"We frequently hear talk of osteoporosis, but do you know what it is—or if you have it?" Read more

Osteoporosis, A Silent Disease
"Like high blood pressure, osteoporosis, or porous bone, is a silent disease that can have devastating effects." Read more

Preparing for Your Pregnancy
"A woman who is thinking about pregnancy can reduce her stress and boost her potential for good health by visiting her doctor both before and during pregnancy." Read more

Put the PacMed Travel Clinic on Your Itinerary
"If you travel outside North America for business, school or pleasure, you'll want to be in good health when you go." Read more

Rejuvenating Your Face with Minimally Invasive Procedures
"Have you been wishing lately for a way to look as young and refreshed as you feel?" Read more

Steps to Prevent Heart Disease
"Heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States for many reasons, but individuals can fight back and not allow themselves to become a statistic." Read more

Urogynecology and Pelvic Floor Disorders
"Some people think these symptoms are normal signs of aging, but they’re not." Read more

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

Immunizations and screenings are easy to forget, yet they are a vital part of leading a healthy life. Use this list of important dates to keep on top of your child’s health. Be happy. Stay healthy.

Well-child exams include immunization updates and a variety of health and development screenings. We recommend visits at the following ages:

2-3 days after discharge12 months
14 days15 months
2 months18 months
4 months2 years
6 monthsAnnually after 2 years
9 months

Immunization Schedule


Hepatitis B: Birth, 1 - 4 mo, 6 - 9 mo
Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis (DTaP): 2 mo, 4 mo, 6 mo, 15 - 18 mo, 4 - 6 yrs
Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (Hib): 2 mo, 4mo, 6 mo, 12 - 15 mo
Polio (IPV): 2 mo, 4mo, 6 - 18 mo, 4 - 6yrs
Pneumococcal (Prevnar): 2 mo, 4mo, 6 mo, 12 - 15 mo
Rotavirus: 2 mo, 4 mo, 6 mo
Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR): 12 - 15 mo, 4 - 6 yrs
Chicken Pox (Varicella): 12 - 18 mo, 4 - 6 yrs
Hepatitis A: 2 doses 6 mo apart after the first birthday
Influenza: Yearly
Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, Gardasil) 9 - 26 yrs, 3-shot series
Meningitis (Menactra): First dose 11 - 12 yrs, second dose 16 - 17 yrs
Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap): 11 - 12 yrs
Anemia and lead screening: 9 mo

You can download our Health Maintenance Guidelines here:

  Health Maintenance Guidelines for Children and Adults






Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

At Pacific Medical Centers, we believe that quality healthcare begins with preventive care and health maintenance. The lifestyle choices you make today will affect your quality of life tomorrow. In this spirit, we’d like to share with you information that can have a positive impact on your future health. Please take the time to explore the content below; we feel it’s important to your well-being.

If you would like more information or wish to make an appointment for a checkup, please choose the "Make a doctor's appointment" link or call us at 1.888.4PACMED. We look forward to sharing a long and healthy relationship with you.

| Aspirin
| Dental Care
| Depression
| Drinking Problem
| Drug and Alcohol Use
| Durable Power of   Attorney and Living Will
| Folic Acid
| Hearing
| Nutrition
| Osteoporosis   Prevention
| Photo Aging and
  Skin Cancer
| Physical Exercise
| Safety
| Sleep Apnea
| STDs
| Tobacco Use
| Vision
| Weight

Aspirin

Are you at risk for heart attack and stroke? Over 40? High blood pressure? Diabetes? A small dose of aspirin may help you. Talk to your doctor.


Dental Care

Part of caring for your body is caring for your teeth and oral health. Everyone needs regular dental cleanings—at least one per year—so visit your dentist regularly.


Depression

Depression is a serious medical condition that can cause disability and even death. Symptoms of depression include:

  • Excessive sadness
  • Diminished interest or pleasure in daily activities
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Increased or decreased sleep
  • Poor concentration
  • Fatigue
  • Recurring thoughts of death or suicide

If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms, please contact your healthcare provider.

For more information, go to www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression

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Drinking Problems

Do you or a loved one have a drinking problem?

  • Have you ever felt that you should cut down on your drinking?
  • Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?
  • Have you ever felt bad or guilty about drinking?
  • Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, it may be time to get help. Contact your healthcare provider or Alcoholics Anonymous.

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Drug and Alcohol Use

  • Use prescription drugs only as directed by a healthcare provider.
  • Use non-prescription drugs only as instructed on the label.
  • Tell your healthcare provider all of the medications you are currently taking, including vitamins and other supplements.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation. Moderation is no more than one drink daily for women and no more than two drinks daily for men.
  • Do not drink alcohol before or while driving a motor vehicle.
  • Don't use illegal (street) drugs.
  • If you have concerns about your alcohol or drug use, talk to your healthcare provider.

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Durable Power of Attorney and Living Will

You can make decisions about your healthcare through legal documents known as a Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare Decisions and a Living Will (a directive to physicians by the patient). Please ask for these forms during a clinic visit. It is also important to talk to your family and healthcare provider about your preferences for treatment, particularly regarding end-of-life issues. If you do not want CPR or other resuscitative efforts, talk to your provider.

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Folic Acid

Folic acid (or folate) is a B vitamin that is in some enriched foods and vitamin pills. Adequate dietary folic acid before and during pregnancy can decrease the risk of birth defects of the baby’s brain and spinal cord. An easy way to get enough folic acid is to take a vitamin with folic acid in it—400 micrograms (or 0.4 milligrams) every day. Folic acid is added to some foods, such as enriched breads, pastas and rice.

Folic acid is found in the following foods:

  • Fortified breakfast cereals
  • Lentils
  • Asparagus
  • Spinach
  • Black beans
  • Peanuts (but do not eat if you have a peanut allergy)
  • Orange juice (from concentrate is best)
  • Enriched breads and pasta
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Broccoli
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Hearing

Untreated hearing loss might lead to feelings of isolation, sadness or anger. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, or have other problems with your ears, talk to your provider about getting a hearing test.

  • Feeling that people mumble more than they used to
  • Missing the clarity of conversations, especially when in a group or a crowd
  • Turning the volume of the TV or the radio louder than what is comfortable for others
  • Being accused by others of being inattentive, preoccupied or "spacey"
  • Hearing noises such as ringing or buzzing in your ears
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Nutrition

Knowing what to eat can be confusing, but if you follow these simple guidelines, you can't go wrong!

  • Eat less, move more.
  • Eat lots of different fruits and vegetables.
  • Choose whole grains such as whole wheat bread or brown rice as your main starch.
  • Use liquid vegetable oils such as canola or olive oil rather than margarine or butter.
  • Choose poultry, fish and low-fat dairy products instead of beef, pork and lamb.
  • Limit sweets.

Eating the right foods will help you live a longer, healthier life. Many illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure can be prevented or controlled through a healthy diet. It is never too late to start eating right. For guidance on how to balance your diet for your individual needs, talk to your provider. Also visit http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/pyramid/ for details on the newest “food pyramid” and information about nutrition and diet.

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Osteoporosis Prevention

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends screening for osteoporosis in all women over the age of 65, plus some younger women at high risk. The most reliable test to determine if a person has osteoporosis is the Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Ask your provider to schedule you for a DXA scan at Pacific Medical Centers to help identify potential risk for future osteoporosis. The DXA exam takes approximately 20 minutes, does not require you to change from your street clothes and involves lying on a very comfortable platform while your bones are being scanned. The process is so comfortable, some patients actually fall asleep during the exam. To prepare for a scan, you should not take a calcium tablet the day before.

To prevent osteoporosis:

  • Participate regularly in weight-bearing exercise.
  • Avoid smoking and excessive alcohol use.
  • Take at least 1200 mg of calcium daily through food or supplements.
  • Women over 50 years old should get 1200 - 1500 mg.
  • In addition, adequate vitamin D is needed for calcium to be absorbed. Try to get 400 - 800 IU daily. You can get this through the diet or through 15 minutes of sun exposure daily.

Calcium Sources in Food Per Serving

Food Source Calcium per Serving Serving Size
Fruit yogurt 314 mg 1 cup
Skim milk 302 mg 1 cup
Bok choy, cooked 252 mg 1 cup
Cheese 174 mg 2 oz.
Broccoli, cooked 136 mg 1 cup
Ice cream 88 mg 1/2 cup

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Photo Aging and Skin Cancer

One in five Americans is affected by skin cancer. More than 90 percent of these cancers are caused by sunburns and blistering that occurred before age 20.

To prevent skin damage from sun, use full-spectrum sunscreen or protective clothing when outdoors. Look for “broad-spectrum” sunscreens that protect against UVA and UVB rays; aim for SPF 30 or higher. Look for ingredients such as Parsol 1789 and octyl methoxycinnamate (a “chemical” block) or titanium or zinc oxide (“physical” blocks) on the label. Avoid any sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. if possible. If you have a personal or family history of skin cancer, mention this to your healthcare provider. You may need a special skin exam periodically.

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Physical Exercise

Physical activity can help prevent at least six diseases: heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and depression. Physical activity also will help you feel better and stay at a healthy weight. Brisk walking can be just as good for you as an activity such as jogging. Try to do a total of 30 minutes of constant physical activity most days of the week. Before you start being physically active: Talk with your provider about ways to get started. Choose something that fits into your daily life, such as brisk walking. Choose an activity you like, such as dancing or swimming. Try a new activity, like biking. Ask a friend to start with you or join a group. Make time for physical activity, start slowly and keep at it. Try to build up your physical stamina.

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Safety

Many serious injuries can be prevented by following basic safety rules:

  • Always wear seat belts while in a vehicle.
  • Never drive after drinking alcohol.
  • Always wear a safety helmet while riding on a motorcycle, bicycle or scooter.
  • Use smoke detectors in your home. Change the batteries every year and check to see that they work every month.
  • Keep the temperature of hot water less than 120°F. This is especially important if there are children or older adults living in your home.
  • Prevent falls by older adults. Repair slippery or uneven walking surfaces, improve poor lighting and install secure railings on all stairways.
  • Be alert for hazards in your workplace and follow all safety rules.

If you choose to keep a gun in your home, make sure that the gun and ammunition are locked up separately and are out of children’s reach.

Firearms pose a particular risk in homes where children, adolescents, domestic violence and alcohol or drug use are present. Firearms should be removed from the house or stored, unloaded, in a locked compartment. Firearm injuries account for about 1,800 unintentional deaths and about five times that many non-fatal injuries each year. Visit lok-it-up.org for information on safe storage of firearms.

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Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea means that you may stop breathing during sleep. This serious medical condition can be associated with many symptoms, including daytime sleepiness, nonrestorative sleep, heavy snoring, restless sleep, night sweats, morning headaches, morning dry mouth, sore throat or hypertension. If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms, please talk to your healthcare provider.

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STDs

Sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs, are infections you can get by having sex with someone who has one of these diseases. Anyone can get an STD. Common STDs are syphilis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, hepatitis B & C and HIV.

Sadly, many people consider sexually transmitted infections a moral issue. Discomfort can get in the way of common sense. Keep yourself healthy by speaking frankly and openly with your provider about your sex life and your sexual health concerns. Safer sex is anything we do to lower our risk of sexually transmitted infection.

Safer-sex practice allows couples to reduce their sexual health risks. The basic rule for safer sex is to prevent contact with genital sores and prevent the exchange of body fluids, such as semen, blood and vaginal secretions. If you have sex just once with someone who has an STD, you can catch it, whether the sex is genital, oral or anal. If you find out you have an STD, tell the person or persons with whom you’ve had sex. Anyone who has had sex with a person with an STD needs to get treatment.

How to Reduce Your Risk of Getting an STD

If you have sex:

  • Have sex with only one, mutually faithful, uninfected partner.
  • Use a latex condom correctly every time you have sex.
  • If you use drugs, do not share needles or syringes.

Consider not having sex.

Contact your healthcare provider or your county's Department of Public Health if you think you may have been exposed to HIV or any sexually transmitted disease.

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Tobacco Use

Don’t start smoking or using smokeless tobacco. If you do smoke, quit. It is the best thing you can do to stay healthy. Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death in the U.S. and causes one in every six deaths annually. Ask your healthcare provider to help you pick a date to quit and for advice on how to keep from starting again.

  • Before trying to quit, stop smoking in places where you spend a lot of time (like at home or in the car).
  • Once you quit, avoid smoking even one puff and try to keep yourself away from all cigarettes. Talk with your provider about things to do when you want a cigarette.
  • If you fail the first time, don’t give up. Keep trying and learn from your experience. Ask yourself what helped or did not help you in trying to quit. You can succeed and live a healthier and longer life.
  • If you have young children, your smoking may harm their health; if you quit, you will be helping them stay healthy, too.

Risks:

  • Stroke
  • Heart attack
  • Cancer of the lung, pancreas, bladder, cervix, mouth and throat
  • Respiratory infections and ulcers
  • Loss of calcium in the bones

Resources:

  • WA State Dept. of Health toll-free quit line: 1-877-270-STOP.
  • American Cancer Society toll-free quit line: 1-800-ACS-2345.
  • Internet resources: www.quitnet.com and www.cdc.gov/tobacco.
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    Vision

    Are you having trouble seeing street signs? Reading your bank statements? All prescription lens wearers (glasses or contacts) should have their eyes rechecked every two years. Ask your healthcare provider for a referral to a doctor who provides preventive eye exams and refractions for glasses and fits contact lenses.

    If you are 65 or older or have a family history of glaucoma, talk to your provider about getting tested.

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    Weight

    Weighing too much or too little can lead to health problems. You should have your weight checked regularly by your healthcare provider. You can control/maintain your weight by eating a healthy diet and getting regular physical activity. Talk with your provider about determining your healthy weight and ways you can control your weight.

    • Find your Body Mass Index (BMI) on the chart below.
    • If you are overweight or obese, losing just 10 percent of your body weight can improve your health.
    • If you need to lose weight, do gradually—1/2 pound to 2 pounds per week.

    Determining BMI

    BMI is a measure of weight in relation to height.

    BMI chart

    As an alternative to calculating BMI, an automatic computerized form to determine BMI is available at NIH.

    Are you at a healthy weight? What is your Body Mass Index?

    BMI chart

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Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

PacMed's “Healthy Today” newsletter has great tips to help you get--and stay--healthy!

Inside This Issue:

  • New Year, New PacMed Clinics
  • Walk Your Way to Better Health
  • Keep Fit as a Family
  • Immunity Boosting Nutrients
  • Simple Stress Reducers
  • Soothing Miso Soup Recipe
  • Do You Know Your Risk for Heart Disease?
  • Flu Prevention Tips

To sign up to receive Healthy Today by email or mail, visit our sign-up page.


Newsletter Archives:

2017
2017, Winter
2017, Summer

2016
2016, Issue 1

2015
2015, Issue 1
2015, Issue 2
2015, Issue 3

2014
Summer 2014
Winter 2014

2013
Winter 2013
Seattle Medical Clinic | Seattle Doctor | Primary Care & Specialty Care at PacMed

The information on this page is not meant to replace health care or other services, but is provided as information only. All of these links will take you to outside websites that have their own privacy guidelines. Pacific Medical Centers claims no responsibility for any of the information contained on this, or any of the linked, websites. Linking to these websites does not constitute any endorsement of any of the sponsors, or institutions, that provide the information. Please see your health care provider to decide on the relevance of any information that you review on the internet.

| Dermatology
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| Neurology
| Obesity
| Optometry
| Orthopedics
| Pediatrics
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| Pulmonary/Sleep
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| Screening   Recommendations
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